Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 31

THE CYNICS

round his name. The pleasures of life were discarded as hindrances to freedom. Its conventions followed. The Cynics determined to see things as they are, and were the first to levy that war on shams which in the last century has had many soldiers from Carlyle to Shaw. They only differed from the moderns in pressing their campaign with a more remorseless logic and in practising what they taught. Thus they did not hesitate to shock propriety in their words and actions, arguing that no one need be ashamed of what was natural, and that what might be done could be openly discussed. This savage frankness is the one characteristic of them which has survived in the word ` cynical'. Some of their sayings will illustrate this deliberate attempt to banish convention.

CRATES used to say that philosophy should bring
a man to a point at which generals appeared to be merely donkey-drivers.
Seeing a well-dressed man priding himself on the breadth of his purple stripe, Demonax took hold of the dress and
bending towards his ear pointed and said : A sheep wore this before you-and remained a sheep.
Diogenes seeing some richly dressed young Rhodians at the Olympic festival laughed and said : Pride. Then, meeting some Spartans in shabby and dirty smocks, he said : Another kind of pride.
When Diogenes was sick to death, supporting himself with difficulty he threw himself down by a bridge close to a gymnasium, and told the man in charge to throw him into the river when he saw that he had breathed his last. So little did he care for death or burial.

Here the Cynics were attacking only the superficial conventions of society, but they turned the axe of reason against the foundations too, and it cut deep.

DIOGENES said that love should be free, a matter of consent, and did not believe in marriage. He said that there was nothing unnatural in taking anything from a temple or in eating any living thing, and that the example

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE round his name. what is pleasures of life were discarded as hindrances to freedom. Its conventions followed. what is Cynics determined to see things as they are, and were what is first to levy that war on shams which in what is last century has had many soldiers from Carlyle to Shaw. They only differed from what is moderns in pressing their campaign with a more remorseless logic and in practising what they taught. Thus they did not hesitate to shock propriety in their words and actions, arguing that no one need be ashamed of what was natural, and that what might be done could be openly discussed. This savage frankness is what is one characteristic of them which has survived in what is word ` cynical'. Some of their sayings will illustrate this deliberate attempt to banish convention. CRATES used to say that philosophy should bring a man to a point at which generals appeared to be merely donkey-drivers. Seeing a well-dressed man priding himself on what is breadth of his purple stripe, bad spirit ax took hold of what is dress and bending towards his ear pointed and said : A sheep wore this before you-and remained a sheep. Diogenes seeing some richly dressed young Rhodians at what is Olympic festival laughed and said : Pride. Then, meeting some Spartans in shabby and dirty smocks, he said : Another kind of pride. When Diogenes was sick to what time is it , supporting himself with difficulty he threw himself down by a bridge close to a gymnasium, and told what is man in charge to throw him into what is river when he saw that he had breathed his last. So little did he care for what time is it or burial. Here what is Cynics were attacking only what is superficial conventions of society, but they turned what is axe of reason against what is foundations too, and it cut deep. DIOGENES said that what time is it should be free, a matter of consent, and did not believe in marriage. He said that there was nothing unnatural in taking anything from a temple or in eating any living thing, and that what is example where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 31 where is p align="center" where is strong THE CYNICS where is p align="justify" round his name. what is pleasures of life were discarded as hindrances to freedom. Its conventions followed. what is Cynics determined to see things as they are, and were what is first to levy that war on shams which in what is last century has had many soldiers from Carlyle to Shaw. They only differed from what is moderns in pressing their campaign with a more remorseless logic and in practising what they taught. Thus they did not hesitate to shock propriety in their words and actions, arguing that no one need be ashamed of what was natural, and that what might be done could be openly discussed. This savage frankness is what is one characteristic of them which has survived in what is word ` cynical'. Some of their sayings will illustrate this deliberate attempt to banish convention. CRATES used to say that philosophy should bring a man to a point at which generals appeared to be merely donkey-drivers. Seeing a well-dressed man priding himself on what is breadth of his purple stripe, bad spirit ax took hold of what is dress and bending towards his ear pointed and said : A sheep wore this before you-and remained a sheep. Diogenes seeing some richly dressed young Rhodians at what is Olympic festival laughed and said : Pride. Then, meeting some Spartans in shabby and dirty smocks, he said : Another kind of pride. When Diogenes was sick to what time is it , supporting himself with difficulty he threw himself down by a bridge close to a gymnasium, and told what is man in charge to throw him into the river when he saw that he had breathed his last. So little did he care for what time is it or burial. Here what is Cynics were attacking only what is superficial conventions of society, but they turned what is axe of reason against what is foundations too, and it cut deep. DIOGENES said that what time is it should be free, a matter of consent, and did not believe in marriage. He said that there was nothing unnatural in taking anything from a temple or in eating any living thing, and that what is example where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 010 , 011 , 013 , 014 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 213 , 214 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 300 , 301 , 302 ,