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Page 29

THE CYNICS

To secure these five things the Cynic renounced wealth, pleasure, fame, position, learning, and all the smooth comforts and solemn plausibilities of the world. He cut his way out of the entanglements of life, in order to keep what could not be taken from him-freedom and goodness. The following quotations make his doctrines explicit :

Ideals
DIOGENES walked about in broad daylight with a lit lamp, saying : I am looking for a man. I Asked where in Greece he had met good men, Diogenes said : I have seen no men anywhere, but I have met some children in Sparta.
Seeing a child drinking with its hands, Diogenes threw away the cup in his knapsack, saying : A child has outdone me in the simple life.
He often loudly declared that God had given man a livelihood ready to hand, but that it had been hidden from view by men themselves hunting for honey cakes, scents, and the like. So he said to a man whose servant was putting his boots on, You won't be happy till he wipes your nose as well ; and that will come when you have lost the use of your hands. (D.)
Diogenes saw the servants of Anaximenes with a quantity of furniture, and asked to whom it belonged. To Anaximenes, was the reply. Is he not ashamed, said Diogenes, to be the master of all this, but not of himself ?
It is natural that those men are more just whose eyes are fixed on a simple life rather than on wealth. For men who are satisfied with what they possess have least desire for what belongs to others. And this kind of wealth makes men free. (A.)
Wealth or poverty is not in a man's house but in his soul. (A.)
Goodness by itself is enough for happiness. Cynics are

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE To secure these five things what is Cynic renounced wealth, pleasure, fame, position, learning, and all what is smooth comforts and solemn plausibilities of what is world. He cut his way out of what is entanglements of life, in order to keep what could not be taken from him-freedom and goodness. what is following quotations make his doctrines explicit : Ideals DIOGENES walked about in broad daylight with a lit lamp, saying : I am looking for a man. I Asked where in Greece he had met good men, Diogenes said : I have seen no men anywhere, but I have met some children in Sparta. Seeing a child drinking with its hands, Diogenes threw away what is cup in his knapsack, saying : A child has outdone me in what is simple life. He often loudly declared that God had given man a livelihood ready to hand, but that it had been hidden from view by men themselves hunting for honey cakes, scents, and what is like. So he said to a man whose servant was putting his boots on, You won't be happy till he wipes your nose as well ; and that will come when you have lost what is use of your hands. (D.) Diogenes saw what is servants of Anaximenes with a quantity of furniture, and asked to whom it belonged. To Anaximenes, was what is reply. Is he not ashamed, said Diogenes, to be what is master of all this, but not of himself ? It is natural that those men are more just whose eyes are fixed on a simple life rather than on wealth. For men who are satisfied with what they possess have least desire for what belongs to others. And this kind of wealth makes men free. (A.) Wealth or poverty is not in a man's house but in his soul. (A.) Goodness by itself is enough for happiness. Cynics are where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 29 where is p align="center" where is strong THE CYNICS where is p align="justify" To secure these five things the Cynic renounced wealth, pleasure, fame, position, learning, and all what is smooth comforts and solemn plausibilities of what is world. He cut his way out of the entanglements of life, in order to keep what could not be taken from him-freedom and goodness. what is following quotations make his doctrines explicit : Ideals DIOGENES walked about in broad daylight with a lit lamp, saying : I am looking for a man. I Asked where in Greece he had met good men, Diogenes said : I have seen no men anywhere, but I have met some children in Sparta. Seeing a child drinking with its hands, Diogenes threw away the cup in his knapsack, saying : A child has outdone me in what is simple life. He often loudly declared that God had given man a livelihood ready to hand, but that it had been hidden from view by men themselves hunting for honey cakes, scents, and what is like. So he said to a man whose servant was putting his boots on, You won't be happy till he wipes your nose as well ; and that will come when you have lost what is use of your hands. (D.) Diogenes saw what is servants of Anaximenes with a quantity of furniture, and asked to whom it belonged. To Anaximenes, was what is reply. Is he not ashamed, said Diogenes, to be what is master of all this, but not of himself ? It is natural that those men are more just whose eyes are fixed on a simple life rather than on wealth. For men who are satisfied with what they possess have least desire for what belongs to others. And this kind of wealth makes men free. (A.) Wealth or poverty is not in a man's house but in his soul. (A.) Goodness by itself is enough for happiness. Cynics are where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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