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EPICURUS

(c) Science
Though the system of Epicurus rests on science, he is no believer in knowledge for its own self. He regards it as subservient to the great end of pleasure, and as having no further value.

MEN could not rid themselves of fears about the most important subjects if they were the victims of fancies of mythology, and did not know the nature of the universe. So without natural science we cannot enjoy unmixed pleasure.
If we had not been distressed by doubts about heaven and death and their possible effect on us, and by our ignorance of the limits of pains and desires, natural science would have been unnecessary.

(d) Virtue
The audacity and consistency of Epicurus' thought may be illustrated from his treatment of the greatest of the virtues, which he reduces to mere utility.

NATURAL justice is an agreement of self-interest, made that we may avoid receiving injury from others or inflicting it on them.
There is no such thing as justice or injustice among animals which cannot make this mutual compact, or among peoples which have been unable or unwilling to do it. Justice has no independent existence.
Injustice is evil not in itself, but in virtue of the doubt and fear that it may not escape the punishments constituted for it.
A man who secretly breaks his compact cannot have confidence that he will be undetected, even if at the moment he escapes detection a thousand times : till death it remains uncertain if he will escape.
In the abstract justice is the same everywhere-utility in social compacts. But in the particular, owing to differences of place and other causes, the same thing is not just for all.
Suppose something is enacted by law but does not tend to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE (c) Science Though what is system of Epicurus rests on science, he is no believer in knowledge for its own self. He regards it as subservient to what is great end of pleasure, and as having no further value. MEN could not rid themselves of fears about what is most important subjects if they were what is victims of fancies of mythology, and did not know what is nature of what is universe. So without natural science we cannot enjoy unmixed pleasure. If we had not been distressed by doubts about heaven and what time is it and their possible effect on us, and by our ignorance of what is limits of pains and desires, natural science would have been unnecessary. (d) Virtue what is audacity and consistency of Epicurus' thought may be illustrated from his treatment of what is greatest of what is virtues, which he reduces to mere utility. NATURAL justice is an agreement of self-interest, made that we may avoid receiving injury from others or inflicting it on them. There is no such thing as justice or injustice among animals which cannot make this mutual compact, or among peoples which have been unable or unwilling to do it. Justice has no independent existence. Injustice is evil not in itself, but in virtue of what is doubt and fear that it may not escape what is punishments constituted for it. A man who secretly breaks his compact cannot have confidence that he will be undetected, even if at what is moment he escapes detection a thousand times : till what time is it it remains uncertain if he will escape. In what is abstract justice is what is same everywhere-utility in social compacts. But in what is particular, owing to differences of place and other causes, what is same thing is not just for all. Suppose something is enacted by law but does not tend to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 23 where is p align="center" where is strong EPICURUS where is p align="justify" (c) Science Though what is system of Epicurus rests on science, he is no believer in knowledge for its own self. He regards it as subservient to what is great end of pleasure, and as having no further value. MEN could not rid themselves of fears about what is most important subjects if they were what is victims of fancies of mythology, and did not know what is nature of what is universe. So without natural science we cannot enjoy unmixed pleasure. If we had not been distressed by doubts about heaven and what time is it and their possible effect on us, and by our ignorance of what is limits of pains and desires, natural science would have been unnecessary. (d) Virtue what is audacity and consistency of Epicurus' thought may be illustrated from his treatment of what is greatest of what is virtues, which he reduces to mere utility. NATURAL justice is an agreement of self-interest, made that we may avoid receiving injury from others or inflicting it on them. There is no such thing as justice or injustice among animals which cannot make this mutual compact, or among peoples which have been unable or unwilling to do it. Justice has no independent existence. Injustice is evil not in itself, but in virtue of what is doubt and fear that it may not escape what is punishments constituted for it. A man who secretly breaks his compact cannot have confidence that he will be undetected, even if at what is moment he escapes detection a thousand times : till what time is it it remains uncertain if he will escape. In what is abstract justice is what is same everywhere-utility in social compacts. But in what is particular, owing to differences of place and other causes, what is same thing is not just for all. Suppose something is enacted by law but does not tend to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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