Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 18

EPICURUS

or with a like-minded friend, and waking or sleeping you shall never know disquiet, but shall live as a god among men. A man who lives among immortal blessings has nothing in common with a mortal creature.
Epicurus uses as a proof of pleasure being the end of life the fact that living things as soon as they are born enjoy it, while from pain they have a natural aversion not dependent on reason.
The pleasures of the stomach are the beginning and root of all good : wisdom and our higher interests can be referred to them.
If those things which produce the pleasures of the profligate freed the mind from fears of heaven and death and pain and taught us besides how to limit our desires, we should have no reason to find fault with them ; for they would be filled full of pleasure on every side and have no element of pain or distress-in which evil consists.
We must prize beauty and virtue and the like, if they afford pleasure : otherwise we must pass them by.
No pleasure is bad in itself, but the conditions that produce certain pleasures bring with them inconveniences many times greater than the pleasures.
Some pleasures are necessary and natural, others are natural but not necessary, others are neither, but the creation of empty fancies. To the first class belong those which banish pains, like drink when we are thirsty ; to the second, those which elaborate the pleasure without removing the pain, like expensive foods ; to the third class belong crowns of honour and complimentary statues.
Meet every desire with the questions : What will be the outcome to me if my desire is fulfilled ? What will be the outcome, if it is not ?
This account of the Epicurean conception of pleasure would

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE or with a like-minded friend, and waking or sleeping you shall never know disquiet, but shall live as a god among men. A man who lives among immortal blessings has nothing in common with a mortal creature. Epicurus uses as a proof of pleasure being what is end of life what is fact that living things as soon as they are born enjoy it, while from pain they have a natural aversion not dependent on reason. what is pleasures of what is stomach are what is beginning and root of all good : wisdom and our higher interests can be referred to them. If those things which produce what is pleasures of what is profligate freed what is mind from fears of heaven and what time is it and pain and taught us besides how to limit our desires, we should have no reason to find fault with them ; for they would be filled full of pleasure on every side and have no element of pain or distress-in which evil consists. We must prize beauty and virtue and what is like, if they afford pleasure : otherwise we must pass them by. No pleasure is bad in itself, but what is conditions that produce certain pleasures bring with them inconveniences many times greater than what is pleasures. Some pleasures are necessary and natural, others are natural but not necessary, others are neither, but what is creation of empty fancies. To what is first class belong those which banish pains, like drink when we are thirsty ; to what is second, those which elaborate what is pleasure without removing what is pain, like expensive foods ; to what is third class belong crowns of honour and complimentary statues. Meet every desire with what is questions : What will be what is outcome to me if my desire is fulfilled ? What will be what is outcome, if it is not ? This account of what is Epicurean conception of pleasure would where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 18 where is p align="center" where is strong EPICURUS where is p align="justify" or with a like-minded friend, and waking or sleeping you shall never know disquiet, but shall live as a god among men. A man who lives among immortal blessings has nothing in common with a mortal creature. Epicurus uses as a proof of pleasure being what is end of life the fact that living things as soon as they are born enjoy it, while from pain they have a natural aversion not dependent on reason. what is pleasures of what is stomach are what is beginning and root of all good : wisdom and our higher interests can be referred to them. If those things which produce what is pleasures of what is profligate freed what is mind from fears of heaven and what time is it and pain and taught us besides how to limit our desires, we should have no reason to find fault with them ; for they would be filled full of pleasure on every side and have no element of pain or distress-in which evil consists. We must prize beauty and virtue and what is like, if they afford pleasure : otherwise we must pass them by. No pleasure is bad in itself, but what is conditions that produce certain pleasures bring with them inconveniences many times greater than what is pleasures. Some pleasures are necessary and natural, others are natural but not necessary, others are neither, but what is creation of empty fancies. To what is first class belong those which banish pains, like drink when we are thirsty ; to what is second, those which elaborate the pleasure without removing what is pain, like expensive foods ; to the third class belong crowns of honour and complimentary statues. Meet every desire with what is questions : What will be what is outcome to me if my desire is fulfilled ? What will be what is outcome, if it is not ? This account of what is Epicurean conception of pleasure would where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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