Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 17

EPICURUS

always to possess little ; but that if our possessions are few, we wish to be able to be content with a little : and we are convinced that wealth is most enjoyed by those who need it least, and that while superfluities are difficult to procure, natural things are easy. Simple flavours give as much pleasure as rich living, when they remove all the pangs of hunger, and bread and water give the keenest delight when hunger sets us down to them.
When we call pleasure the end of life, we do not mean the pleasure of the profligate or the voluptuary, as some declare, who do not know, or dissent from, or misunderstand our teaching. We mean freedom from pain of body or disturbance of mind. The life of pleasure does not come from drinking, or from revel on revel, or from sensual pleasures and banquets of fish I and all that the table of the rich affords. It comes from sober thought, exploring the grounds of all our choices and avoidances, and expelling the notions which expose the soul to most disturbance. Practical good sense z is the origin of all this and the greatest of goods. So good sense, the origin of all the other virtues, is more precious than philosophy. It teaches us that we cannot live pleasurably unless we live wisely and nobly and justly, nor wisely and nobly and justly, unless we live pleasurably. The virtues are knit into the life of pleasure, and life is inseparable from them. For whom do you rate higher than the man who has right beliefs about God, who is never afraid of death, who has calculated the aim of Nature, who realizes that pleasure is easy to procure and achieve, that pain is shortlived either in its intensity or in its duration, that necessity, which some install as the queen of the world, is partly a question of fortune and partly in our power?
Meditate these things continually day and night by yourself

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE always to possess little ; but that if our possessions are few, we wish to be able to be content with a little : and we are convinced that wealth is most enjoyed by those who need it least, and that while superfluities are difficult to procure, natural things are easy. Simple flavours give as much pleasure as rich living, when they remove all what is pangs of hunger, and bread and water give what is keenest delight when hunger sets us down to them. When we call pleasure what is end of life, we do not mean what is pleasure of what is profligate or what is voluptuary, as some declare, who do not know, or dissent from, or misunderstand our teaching. We mean freedom from pain of body or disturbance of mind. what is life of pleasure does not come from drinking, or from revel on revel, or from sensual pleasures and banquets of fish I and all that what is table of what is rich affords. It comes from sober thought, exploring what is grounds of all our choices and avoidances, and expelling what is notions which expose what is soul to most disturbance. Practical good sense z is what is origin of all this and what is greatest of goods. So good sense, what is origin of all what is other virtues, is more precious than philosophy. It teaches us that we cannot live pleasurably unless we live wisely and nobly and justly, nor wisely and nobly and justly, unless we live pleasurably. what is virtues are knit into what is life of pleasure, and life is inseparable from them. For whom do you rate higher than what is man who has right beliefs about God, who is never afraid of what time is it , who has calculated what is aim of Nature, who realizes that pleasure is easy to procure and achieve, that pain is shortlived either in its intensity or in its duration, that necessity, which some install as what is queen of what is world, is partly a question of fortune and partly in our power? Meditate these things continually day and night by yourself where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 17 where is p align="center" where is strong EPICURUS where is p align="justify" always to possess little ; but that if our possessions are few, we wish to be able to be content with a little : and we are convinced that wealth is most enjoyed by those who need it least, and that while superfluities are difficult to procure, natural things are easy. Simple flavours give as much pleasure as rich living, when they remove all what is pangs of hunger, and bread and water give what is keenest delight when hunger sets us down to them. When we call pleasure what is end of life, we do not mean what is pleasure of what is profligate or what is voluptuary, as some declare, who do not know, or dissent from, or misunderstand our teaching. We mean freedom from pain of body or disturbance of mind. what is life of pleasure does not come from drinking, or from revel on revel, or from sensual pleasures and banquets of fish I and all that what is table of the rich affords. It comes from sober thought, exploring what is grounds of all our choices and avoidances, and expelling what is notions which expose what is soul to most disturbance. Practical good sense z is what is origin of all this and what is greatest of goods. So good sense, what is origin of all what is other virtues, is more precious than philosophy. It teaches us that we cannot live pleasurably unless we live wisely and nobly and justly, nor wisely and nobly and justly, unless we live pleasurably. what is virtues are knit into what is life of pleasure, and life is inseparable from them. For whom do you rate higher than what is man who has right beliefs about God, who is never afraid of what time is it , who has calculated what is aim of Nature, who realizes that pleasure is easy to procure and achieve, that pain is shortlived either in its intensity or in its duration, that necessity, which some install as what is queen of what is world, is partly a question of fortune and partly in our power? Meditate these things continually day and night by yourself where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 010 , 011 , 013 , 014 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 213 , 214 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 300 , 301 , 302 ,