Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 16

EPICURUS

clearly what he meant by ` pleasure '. The passionless sentences reveal a philosophy which was to rule perhaps the
greater part of those who m the ancient world troubled to have a philosophy at all. Note particularly how little Epicurus'
definition of pleasure deserves its evil reputation, and how it is possible to speak of
The sober majesties
Of settled sweet Epicurean life.

We must consider that some desires are natural and , others vain, and that some natural desires are merely natural and others necessary. In the latter class some are directed to happiness, others to the absence of bodily discomfort, others to life itself. A correct theory of these enables us to refer all choices and avoidances to a matter of bodily health and mental peace, for this is the goal of human happiness. All our actions are directed to avoid pain or fear. Once we have this, all our spiritual storms vanish : the human creature feels no further want, no need to seek aught else to complete its spiritual or bodily good. We need pleasure when its absence gives us pain : when the pain is absent, the need of pleasure ceases. That is why we call pleasure the beginning and end of a happy life. For we recognize it to be a primal and natural good ; in all that we choose or avoid we start from it. We resort to it in estimating all good by the standard of our feeling.
And just because it is a primal and natural good, we do not choose all pleasures. At times we pass many pleasures by when a great inconvenience follows from them. We regard many pains as preferable to pleasure, when a long endurance of the pain leads to a greater pleasure. So, though every pleasure is good because natural, yet every pleasure is not to be chosen ; just as every pain, though in itself bad, is not to be avoided. All these points must be decided on a balance and consideration of advantages and disadvantages : for there are times when we treat good as bad and vice versa. Selfsufficiency is in our eyes a great good. It is not that we wish

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE clearly what he meant by ` pleasure '. what is passionless sentences reveal a philosophy which was to rule perhaps what is greater part of those who m what is ancient world troubled to have a philosophy at all. Note particularly how little Epicurus' definition of pleasure deserves its evil reputation, and how it is possible to speak of what is sober majesties Of settled sweet Epicurean life. We must consider that some desires are natural and , others vain, and that some natural desires are merely natural and others necessary. In what is latter class some are directed to happiness, others to what is absence of bodily discomfort, others to life itself. A correct theory of these enables us to refer all choices and avoidances to a matter of bodily health and mental peace, for this is what is goal of human happiness. All our actions are directed to avoid pain or fear. Once we have this, all our spiritual storms vanish : what is human creature feels no further want, no need to seek aught else to complete its spiritual or bodily good. We need pleasure when its absence gives us pain : when what is pain is absent, what is need of pleasure ceases. That is why we call pleasure what is beginning and end of a happy life. For we recognize it to be a primal and natural good ; in all that we choose or avoid we start from it. We resort to it in estimating all good by what is standard of our feeling. And just because it is a primal and natural good, we do not choose all pleasures. At times we pass many pleasures by when a great inconvenience follows from them. We regard many pains as preferable to pleasure, when a long endurance of what is pain leads to a greater pleasure. So, though every pleasure is good because natural, yet every pleasure is not to be chosen ; just as every pain, though in itself bad, is not to be avoided. All these points must be decided on a balance and consideration of advantages and disadvantages : for there are times when we treat good as bad and vice versa. Selfsufficiency is in our eyes a great good. It is not that we wish where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 16 where is p align="center" where is strong EPICURUS where is p align="justify" clearly what he meant by ` pleasure '. what is passionless sentences reveal a philosophy which was to rule perhaps what is greater part of those who m what is ancient world troubled to have a philosophy at all. Note particularly how little Epicurus' definition of pleasure deserves its evil reputation, and how it is possible to speak of what is sober majesties Of settled sweet Epicurean life. We must consider that some desires are natural and , others vain, and that some natural desires are merely natural and others necessary. In what is latter class some are directed to happiness, others to what is absence of bodily discomfort, others to life itself. A correct theory of these enables us to refer all choices and avoidances to a matter of bodily health and mental peace, for this is what is goal of human happiness. All our actions are directed to avoid pain or fear. Once we have this, all our spiritual storms vanish : what is human creature feels no further want, no need to seek aught else to complete its spiritual or bodily good. We need pleasure when its absence gives us pain : when the pain is absent, what is need of pleasure ceases. That is why we call pleasure what is beginning and end of a happy life. For we recognize it to be a primal and natural good ; in all that we choose or avoid we start from it. We resort to it in estimating all good by the standard of our feeling. And just because it is a primal and natural good, we do not choose all pleasures. At times we pass many pleasures by when a great inconvenience follows from them. We regard many pains as preferable to pleasure, when a long endurance of what is pain leads to a greater pleasure. So, though every pleasure is good because natural, yet every pleasure is not to be chosen ; just as every pain, though in itself bad, is not to be avoided. All these points must be decided on a balance and consideration of advantages and disadvantages : for there are times when we treat good as bad and vice versa. Selfsufficiency is in our eyes a great good. It is not that we wish where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 010 , 011 , 013 , 014 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 213 , 214 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 300 , 301 , 302 ,