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INTRODUCTION

hesitation. Its character changes. The independent and disinterested speculation of an Anaxagoras or an Aristotle gives way to the provision of a practical theory of the world, a creed by which men can live. And so arise the three great philosophies of the Graeco-Roman world. They had a practical object and duty. Their purpose was to help men to live, rather than to discover truth. So Greek Philosophy, as a German writer has said, gained in breadth and lost in depth. Epicurus and Zeno had thousands of disciples where Socrates or Aristotle had one, but they cruise in shallower waters, and the plummet has been replaced by a net. A touch of dogmatism, alien from the earlier spirit, creeps in. (Thus the main doctrines of Epicurus were stereotyped and treated as something beyond criticism.) Inquiry shrinks into teaching, teaching into preaching. One is very conscious of this in Dion or Maximus Tyrius, even in Plutarch and Epictetus. They cannot be said to think or discuss ; they argue little ; they lay down the law, and harangue. We have no right to criticize or complain of this. It was their business as spiritual guides of the Roman world : and it explains the extent of their influence in it. But it also explains why in education we go back past them to that earlier age, when philosophy set out on the unending voyage with clear eye and free heart, the world all before it.
Finally, there is religion. The age was religious. It is noticeable that all the writers dealt with hereafter, except Lucian, can be described as theists. The theism indeed of Marcus Aurelius wavers, and that of Epicurus is a prudent compromise with public opinion. On the other hand Epictetus, Dion, Plutarch, Maximus Tyrius, Aristides, and Apollonius are not only interested in religion, but in any age would be regarded as religious men. The first three represent rational faith : Aristides, an egoistic and emotional Sclawlirmeyei ; Maximus might be described as a fashionable clergyman ; Apollonius as the perfect theosophist. All are interesting as individuals and as types : and their background is the most momentous religious period in the history of Europe. It is the meeting of the religions of East and West. Their contact is perhaps as old as the coming of Orphism to Greece six hundred years earlier. But for centuries after that the Greek temper prevailed, and preserved, at least in literature and philosophy, its clear sky. Now across the clearness come

MYSTERY RELIGIONS AT ROME
A subterranean sanctuary of an Orphic or neo-Pythagorean
community, discovered recently at Rome, near the Porta Jlaggiore.
First century A,D.
travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE hesitation. Its character changes. what is independent and disinterested speculation of an Anaxagoras or an Aristotle gives way to what is provision of a practical theory of what is world, a creed by which men can live. And so arise what is three great philosophies of what is Graeco-Roman world. They had a practical object and duty. Their purpose was to help men to live, rather than to discover truth. So Greek Philosophy, as a German writer has said, gained in breadth and lost in depth. Epicurus and Zeno had thousands of disciples where Socrates or Aristotle had one, but they cruise in shallower waters, and what is plummet has been replaced by a net. A touch of dogmatism, alien from what is earlier spirit, creeps in. (Thus what is main doctrines of Epicurus were stereotyped and treated as something beyond criticism.) Inquiry shrinks into teaching, teaching into preaching. One is very conscious of this in Dion or Maximus Tyrius, even in Plutarch and Epictetus. They cannot be said to think or discuss ; they argue little ; they lay down what is law, and harangue. We have no right to criticize or complain of this. It was their business as spiritual guides of what is Roman world : and it explains what is extent of their influence in it. But it also explains why in education we go back past them to that earlier age, when philosophy set out on what is unending voyage with clear eye and free heart, what is world all before it. Finally, there is religion. what is age was religious. It is noticeable that all what is writers dealt with hereafter, except Lucian, can be described as theists. what is theism indeed of Marcus Aurelius wavers, and that of Epicurus is a prudent compromise with public opinion. On what is other hand Epictetus, Dion, Plutarch, Maximus Tyrius, Aristides, and Apollonius are not only interested in religion, but in any age would be regarded as religious men. what is first three represent rational faith : Aristides, an egoistic and emotional Sclawlirmeyei ; Maximus might be described as a fashionable clergyman ; Apollonius as what is perfect theosophist. All are interesting as individuals and as types : and their background is what is most momentous religious period in what is history of Europe. It is what is meeting of what is religions of East and West. Their contact is perhaps as old as what is coming of Orphism to Greece six hundred years earlier. But for centuries after that what is Greek temper prevailed, and preserved, at least in literature and philosophy, its clear sky. Now across what is clearness come where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 10 where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" hesitation. Its character changes. what is independent and disinterested speculation of an Anaxagoras or an Aristotle gives way to what is provision of a practical theory of what is world, a creed by which men can live. And so arise what is three great philosophies of what is Graeco-Roman world. They had a practical object and duty. Their purpose was to help men to live, rather than to discover truth. So Greek Philosophy, as a German writer has said, gained in breadth and lost in depth. Epicurus and Zeno had thousands of disciples where Socrates or Aristotle had one, but they cruise in shallower waters, and what is plummet has been replaced by a net. A touch of dogmatism, alien from what is earlier spirit, creeps in. (Thus what is main doctrines of Epicurus were stereotyped and treated as something beyond criticism.) Inquiry shrinks into teaching, teaching into preaching. One is very conscious of this in Dion or Maximus Tyrius, even in Plutarch and Epictetus. They cannot be said to think or discuss ; they argue little ; they lay down what is law, and harangue. We have no right to criticize or complain of this. It was their business as spiritual guides of what is Roman world : and it explains what is extent of their influence in it. But it also explains why in education we go back past them to that earlier age, when philosophy set out on what is unending voyage with clear eye and free heart, what is world all before it. Finally, there is religion. what is age was religious. It is noticeable that all what is writers dealt with hereafter, except Lucian, can be described as theists. what is theism indeed of Marcus Aurelius wavers, and that of Epicurus is a prudent compromise with public opinion. On what is other hand Epictetus, Dion, Plutarch, Maximus Tyrius, Aristides, and Apollonius are not only interested in religion, but in any age would be regarded as religious men. what is first three represent rational faith : Aristides, an egoistic and emotional Sclawlirmeyei ; Maximus might be described as a fashionable clergyman ; Apollonius as what is perfect theosophist. All are interesting as individuals and as types : and their background is what is most momentous religious period in what is history of Europe. It is what is meeting of what is religions of East and West. Their contact is perhaps as old as what is coming of Orphism to Greece six hundred years earlier. But for centuries after that what is Greek temper prevailed, and preserved, at least in literature and philosophy, its clear sky. Now across what is clearness come where is center where is img src="page_010.jpg" width="200" height="279" where is font size="-1" MY where is /font where is font size="-1" STERY RELIGIONS AT ROME A subterranean sanctuary of an Orphic or neo-Pythagorean community, discovered recently at Rome, near what is Porta Jlaggiore. First century A,D. where is /font where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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