Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 9

INTRODUCTION

himself in such a role, or dream of leaving his study to assume it ?
It is easy to explain the importance of philosophy in the years immediately preceding and following the birth of Christ. There was need for it. The fall of the Greek states before Alexander and his generals called it to activity and gave birth to the three creeds of which I have spoken. A new world came into existence. It is difficult to realize how completely the ancient city state had engrossed the activities and fenced the lives of its inhabitants. Now the city failed them. Its iboundaries were broken, its religion discredited, its moral ideals overthrown. Cosmopolitanism with a confusion of ethical standards flooded in, and morality was sapped at the very moment when it was most needed. Even when the Roman Empire came things were little better. It did indeed bring peace and civic order ; but unity of moral ideals and standards it could not bring. This was the work of philosophy, which stepped in to give a direction to these desorientes, to tend these sheep without a shepherd, to teach the world how to live. It did its work well. Its three great differing creeds are plausible to-day. They do not leak more than any of their modern rivals ; nor has any practical philosophy come to birth since which can compare with them in influence and importance.
They are, of course, very different from their predecessors. They differ in spirit as well as in conclusions. Except Epicurus, who recalls the fifth-century writers, the later thinkers have not the freshness, the natural and effortless genius of the earlier. And they bear the mark of their time in other ways. Greek thought commenced in an attempt to understand the universe, and down to Aristotle it retains something of the excitement of an exploration. It is on a quest. Candour and originality are its marks, discovery its aim. For originality, for audacity, for detachment from prejudice and presupposition, the earlier thinkers bear the palm. For the most part they had no interest except truth. They were not called upon to provide their countrymen with a creed or way of life. But when the city life collapsed, a new call was made on philosophy. Its task was no longer the contemplation of the universe, but the provision of a creed. The motive was no longer Bavµa, ` wonder,' as Aristotle had defined it, but the desire to save human souls. It took up its new task without

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE himself in such a role, or dream of leaving his study to assume it ? It is easy to explain what is importance of philosophy in what is N-cars immediately preceding and following what is birth of Christ. There was need for it. what is fall of what is Greek states before Alexander and his generals called it to activity and gave birth to what is three creeds of which I have spoken. A new world came into existence. It is difficult to realize how completely what is ancient city state had engrossed what is activities and fenced what is lives of its inhabitants. Now what is city failed them. Its iboundaries were broken, its religion discredited, its moral ideals overthrown. Cosmopolitanism with a confusion of ethical standards flooded in, and morality was sapped at what is very moment when it was most needed. Even when what is Roman Empire came things were little better. It did indeed bring peace and civic order ; but unity of moral ideals and standards it could not bring. This was what is work of philosophy, which stepped in to give a direction to these desorientes, to tend these sheep without a shepherd, to teach what is world how to live. It did its work well. Its three great differing creeds are plausible to-day. They do not leak more than any of their modern rivals ; nor has any practical philosophy come to birth since which can compare with them in influence and importance. They are, of course, very different from their predecessors. They differ in spirit as well as in conclusions. Except Epicurus, who recalls what is fifth-century writers, what is later thinkers have not what is freshness, what is natural and effortless genius of what is earlier. And they bear what is mark of their time in other ways. Greek thought commenced in an attempt to understand what is universe, and down to Aristotle it retains something of what is excitement of an exploration. It is on a quest. Candour and originality are its marks, discovery its aim. For originality, for audacity, for detachment from prejudice and presupposition, what is earlier thinkers bear what is palm. For what is most part they had no interest except truth. They were not called upon to provide their countrymen with a creed or way of life. But when what is city life collapsed, a new call was made on philosophy. Its task was no longer what is contemplation of what is universe, but what is provision of a creed. what is motive was no longer Bavµa, ` wonder,' as Aristotle had defined it, but what is desire to save human souls. It took up its new task without where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 9 where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" himself in such a role, or dream of leaving his study to assume it ? It is easy to explain what is importance of philosophy in what is years immediately preceding and following what is birth of Christ. There was need for it. what is fall of what is Greek states before Alexander and his generals called it to activity and gave birth to what is three creeds of which I have spoken. A new world came into existence. It is difficult to realize how completely what is ancient city state had engrossed what is activities and fenced what is lives of its inhabitants. Now what is city failed them. Its iboundaries were broken, its religion discredited, its moral ideals overthrown. Cosmopolitanism with a confusion of ethical standards flooded in, and morality was sapped at what is very moment when it was most needed. Even when what is Roman Empire came things were little better. It did indeed bring peace and civic order ; but unity of moral ideals and standards it could not bring. This was what is work of philosophy, which stepped in to give a direction to these desorientes, to tend these sheep without a shepherd, to teach what is world how to live. It did its work well. Its three great differing creeds are plausible to-day. They do not leak more than any of their modern rivals ; nor has any practical philosophy come to birth since which can compare with them in influence and importance. They are, of course, very different from their predecessors. They differ in spirit as well as in conclusions. Except Epicurus, who recalls what is fifth-century writers, what is later thinkers have not what is freshness, what is natural and effortless genius of what is earlier. And they bear what is mark of their time in other ways. Greek thought commenced in an attempt to understand what is universe, and down to Aristotle it retains something of what is excitement of an exploration. It is on a quest. Candour and originality are its marks, discovery its aim. For originality, for audacity, for detachment from prejudice and presupposition, what is earlier thinkers bear what is palm. For the most part they had no interest except truth. They were not called upon to provide their countrymen with a creed or way of life. But when what is city life collapsed, a new call was made on philosophy. Its task was no longer what is contemplation of what is universe, but the provision of a creed. what is motive was no longer Bavµa, ` wonder,' as Aristotle had defined it, but what is desire to save human souls. It took up its new task without where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 010 , 011 , 013 , 014 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 213 , 214 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 300 , 301 , 302 ,