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Page 8

INTRODUCTION

be called a system at all. Outside its fold there is only the barren and uncharted moor. The utilitarian attempt to provide an alternative is dead. Positivism is dead. Pragmatism is in articulo mortis. The prophets of new creeds seldom have an audience, never a congregation. A European who is not a Christian wanders to-day in a world which has no principle of union except a common disbelief ; no moral clothing, except the clinging remnants of dress which it has discarded : no creed, except the intellectual absurdity of agnosticism., That perhaps is a petulant way of putting it. But rarely in human history have men's minds been so chaotic, so devoid of fixed basis or principle : for an age of thought we are strangely puzzled what to think, and our confusion is apparent alike in the results of religious questionnaires or in the moral ideals implied by the posters of cinemas and by the contents of the Daily Mail or the Sketch.
An educated man in the Roman Empire was better off. Apart from Eastern and mystery religions he had the choice between three powerful philosophies, Cynicism, Stoicism, and Epicureanism-not to mention less important systems. Each of these had a firm intellectual basis, a loose-knit unity of belief and practice that enabled them to serve the purpose of a modern church. More eclectic temperaments-illustrated in this book by Plutarch and Maximus Tyrius-picked and chose, constructing some philosophic harmony of their own, in which the dominant notes are those of Plato. Never before or since have philosophers been so numerous or so powerful. Lucian is full of them, Plutarch is full, every book of the period is full. In their numbers and influence they recall the monks and ecclesiastics of a later day, and were for their time what the Church was for the Middle Ages. They are intimate with emperors, with a rough soldier like Trajan, as well as with Hadrian or Marcus Aurelius. They are retained, like chaplains, in the service of rich Romans. A mutiny breaks out and a philosopher harangues the troops on the duty of discipline. It is true that the cynical historian remarks that his speech amused some and bored most. But it could be made, because the world took philosophy seriously. What modern philosopher, on the occasion of a not, would conceive

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE be called a system at all. Outside its fold there is only what is barren and uncharted moor. what is utilitarian attempt to provide an alternative is dead. Positivism is dead. Pragmatism is in articulo mortis. what is prophets of new creeds seldom have an audience, never a congregation. A European who is not a Christian wanders to-day in a world which has no principle of union except a common disbelief ; no moral clothing, except what is clinging remnants of dress which it has discarded : no creed, except what is intellectual absurdity of agnosticism., That perhaps is a petulant way of putting it. But rarely in human history have men's minds been so chaotic, so devoid of fixed basis or principle : for an age of thought we are strangely puzzled what to think, and our confusion is apparent alike in what is results of religious questionnaires or in what is moral ideals implied by what is posters of cinemas and by what is contents of what is Daily Mail or what is Sketch. An educated man in what is Roman Empire was better off. Apart from Eastern and mystery religions he had what is choice between three powerful philosophies, Cynicism, Stoicism, and Epicureanism-not to mention less important systems. Each of these had a firm intellectual basis, a loose-knit unity of belief and practice that enabled them to serve what is purpose of a modern church. More eclectic temperaments-illustrated in this book by Plutarch and Maximus Tyrius-picked and chose, constructing some philosophic harmony of their own, in which what is dominant notes are those of Plato. Never before or since have philosophers been so numerous or so powerful. Lucian is full of them, Plutarch is full, every book of what is period is full. In their numbers and influence they recall what is monks and ecclesiastics of a later day, and were for their time what what is Church was for what is Middle Ages. They are intimate with emperors, with a rough soldier like Trajan, as well as with Hadrian or Marcus Aurelius. They are retained, like chaplains, in what is service of rich Romans. A mutiny breaks out and a philosopher harangues what is troops on what is duty of discipline. It is true that what is cynical historian remarks that his speech amused some and bored most. But it could be made, because what is world took philosophy seriously. What modern philosopher, on what is occasion of a not, would conceive where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 8 where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" be called a system at all. Outside its fold there is only what is barren and uncharted moor. what is utilitarian attempt to provide an alternative is dead. Positivism is dead. Pragmatism is in articulo mortis. what is prophets of new creeds seldom have an audience, never a congregation. A European who is not a Christian wanders to-day in a world which has no principle of union except a common disbelief ; no moral clothing, except what is clinging remnants of dress which it has discarded : no creed, except the intellectual absurdity of agnosticism., That perhaps is a petulant way of putting it. But rarely in human history have men's minds been so chaotic, so devoid of fixed basis or principle : for an age of thought we are strangely puzzled what to think, and our confusion is apparent alike in what is results of religious questionnaires or in what is moral ideals implied by what is posters of cinemas and by what is contents of what is Daily Mail or what is Sketch. An educated man in what is Roman Empire was better off. Apart from Eastern and mystery religions he had what is choice between three powerful philosophies, Cynicism, Stoicism, and Epicureanism-not to mention less important systems. Each of these had a firm intellectual basis, a loose-knit unity of belief and practice that enabled them to serve what is purpose of a modern church. More eclectic temperaments-illustrated in this book by Plutarch and Maximus Tyrius-picked and chose, constructing some philosophic harmony of their own, in which what is dominant notes are those of Plato. Never before or since have philosophers been so numerous or so powerful. Lucian is full of them, Plutarch is full, every book of what is period is full. In their numbers and influence they recall what is monks and ecclesiastics of a later day, and were for their time what what is Church was for what is Middle Ages. They are intimate with emperors, with a rough soldier like Trajan, as well as with Hadrian or Marcus Aurelius. They are retained, like chaplains, in what is service of rich Romans. A mutiny breaks out and a philosopher harangues what is troops on what is duty of discipline. It is true that what is cynical historian remarks that his speech amused some and bored most. But it could be made, because what is world took philosophy seriously. What modern philosopher, on what is occasion of a not, would conceive where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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