Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 7

INTRODUCTION

Shapes that haunt thought's wildernesses ...
Forms more real than living man,
Nurslings of immortality :

and this age had the instinct of literary creation as strongly as any of its predecessors. This sounds paradoxical. What Greek literature can the first two centuries of our era show ? There is no drama, no epic, no lyric : indeed apart from the epigram there is no poetry at all. One could hardly call
Plutarch's writings literature, Lucian is little more than an essayist. But if we conclude from this that the age is barren in literature, we are wrong. Our error arises because most of the literature is lost, and we fail either to read what remains or to recognize its significance. Not Lucian or Dion or Plutarch are the real representatives of literature in this period. At least their contemporaries would not have thought so. We must look rather to the Lives of the Sophists by Philostratus, and find in his unfamiliar heroes its true representatives. Hard things have been said about these sophists. Yet few men have given themselves with a more unfeigned devotion to literature. They saw her in the guise of literary art. By art they understood the manipulation of language and rhythm for their own sake, and if complete mastery of these were everything, if epigram and diction and music, devoid of sense and solidity and truth, were literature, they would be supreme writers. Their work is a signal instance of wasted ability and effort, and their chief value is as signposts warning us of a road that leads nowhere. English Literature perhaps has never been so interested in literary form as to need the warning. But the French Symbolists might have taken it to heart, and some modern developments in painting might have profited by it. One chapter in this book is given to the ` Sophists '; but Aristides, who is treated from another aspect, was a famous representative of them, and Dion and Lucian belonged to the profession in early life.
Two-thirds of my chapters deal with philosophy, and the most striking figures in what I have called the spiritual tapestry of the time were philosophers. It is a point in which the Graeco-Roman world differed from, and had an advantage over our own. The truth of Christianity to-day is widely and seriously questioned, but it remains the only system of thought in the West which has any general acceptance, or indeed can

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Shapes that haunt thought's wildernesses ... Forms more real than living man, Nurslings of immortality : and this age had what is instinct of literary creation as strongly as any of its predecessors. This sounds paradoxical. What Greek literature can what is first two centuries of our era show ? There is no drama, no epic, no lyric : indeed apart from what is epigram there is no poetry at all. One could hardly call Plutarch's writings literature, Lucian is little more than an essayist. But if we conclude from this that what is age is barren in literature, we are wrong. Our error arises because most of what is literature is lost, and we fail either to read what remains or to recognize its significance. Not Lucian or Dion or Plutarch are what is real representatives of literature in this period. At least their contemporaries would not have thought so. We must look rather to what is Lives of what is Sophists by Philostratus, and find in his unfamiliar heroes its true representatives. Hard things have been said about these sophists. Yet few men have given themselves with a more unfeigned devotion to literature. They saw her in what is guise of literary art. By art they understood what is manipulation of language and rhythm for their own sake, and if complete mastery of these were everything, if epigram and diction and music, devoid of sense and solidity and truth, were literature, they would be supreme writers. Their work is a signal instance of wasted ability and effort, and their chief value is as signposts warning us of a road that leads nowhere. English Literature perhaps has never been so interested in literary form as to need what is warning. But what is French Symbolists might have taken it to heart, and some modern developments in painting might have profited by it. One chapter in this book is given to what is ` Sophists '; but Aristides, who is treated from another aspect, was a famous representative of them, and Dion and Lucian belonged to what is profession in early life. Two-thirds of my chapters deal with philosophy, and what is most striking figures in what I have called what is spiritual tapestry of what is time were philosophers. It is a point in which what is Graeco-Roman world differed from, and had an advantage over our own. what is truth of Christianity to-day is widely and seriously questioned, but it remains what is only system of thought in what is West which has any general acceptance, or indeed can where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 7 where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" Shapes that haunt thought's wildernesses ... Forms more real than living man, Nurslings of immortality : and this age had what is instinct of literary creation as strongly as any of its predecessors. This sounds paradoxical. What Greek literature can what is first two centuries of our era show ? There is no drama, no epic, no lyric : indeed apart from what is epigram there is no poetry at all. One could hardly call Plutarch's writings literature, Lucian is little more than an essayist. But if we conclude from this that what is age is barren in literature, we are wrong. Our error arises because most of what is literature is lost, and we fail either to read what remains or to recognize its significance. Not Lucian or Dion or Plutarch are what is real representatives of literature in this period. At least their contemporaries would not have thought so. We must look rather to what is Lives of what is Sophists by Philostratus, and find in his unfamiliar heroes its true representatives. Hard things have been said about these sophists. Yet few men have given themselves with a more unfeigned devotion to literature. They saw her in what is guise of literary art. By art they understood what is manipulation of language and rhythm for their own sake, and if complete mastery of these were everything, if epigram and diction and music, devoid of sense and solidity and truth, were literature, they would be supreme writers. Their work is a signal instance of wasted ability and effort, and their chief value is as signposts warning us of a road that leads nowhere. English Literature perhaps has never been so interested in literary form as to need what is warning. But what is French Symbolists might have taken it to heart, and some modern developments in painting might have profited by it. One chapter in this book is given to what is ` Sophists '; but Aristides, who is treated from another aspect, was a famous representative of them, and Dion and Lucian belonged to what is profession in early life. Two-thirds of my chapters deal with philosophy, and what is most striking figures in what I have called what is spiritual tapestry of what is time were philosophers. It is a point in which what is Graeco-Roman world differed from, and had an advantage over our own. what is truth of Christianity to-day is widely and seriously questioned, but it remains what is only system of thought in what is West which has any general acceptance, or indeed can where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 010 , 011 , 013 , 014 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 213 , 214 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 300 , 301 , 302 ,