Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 6

INTRODUCTION

a man could buy truffles from Africa, pheasants from the Black Sea coast, oysters from Britain, porcelain and silk from China. And for the last time for many hundred years it was possible to travel in safety and comparative comfort from York to Alexandria, from Cologne to Damascus. Such was the world in which Epictetus or Lucian lived, and its likeness to our own makes it easily intelligible. Readers unfamiliar with the classics find the atmosphere of Plato or Aristotle strange, but Lucian and Marcus Aurelius appeal to any one. The older writers are indeed the greater. But the later speak our spiritual language ; their outlook and problems are close to ours ; their world is modern and we are instinctively at home in it. There is no need of an imaginative effort to acclimatize ourselves.

Every age weaves on the plain background of its material existence the patterned tapestry of what may be called a spiritual life. Religion, intellect, art, character, social or political life may be the theme. The background, though essential to the pattern, has no value and little interest apart from it. By the fineness and permanence of the pattern which it weaves, and by that alone, a nation is judged, and takes its rank in the history of mankind. And if this book has any interest it is for the glimpses which it affords of the tapestry woven by some Greek writers on the background of a world wealthy and at peace glimpses of some of the spiritual ideals of the Roman Empire.
We find three chief themes in this tapestry. Of the scientific ideal as we understand it, the desire of knowledge for its own sake, and the hope of controlling nature through knowledge, there is indeed little or no trace. Science there was. Galen in medicine, Heron in mathematics and mechanics, Ptolemy in optics, astronomy, and geography are eminent names. But their science was more laborious than original ; it lacks the genius and the passionate intellectual interest of a Hippocrates, an Aristotle, an Archimedes. It has no influence on the spiritual life of the age and can hardly be said to play a part in it. It is therefore ignored in this volume.
Literature, on the other hand, is prominent in our tapestry. It would be strange were it otherwise. For the human instinct is persistent to create a world of beauty and people it with


COSMOPOLITANISM IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE
Grace stele of a rich Palmyrene lady, second centnrv A.D. The
inscription is in Greek, `Athanaia wife of Malchus'. Paimyra was
the centre of the caravan-trade -with the East

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE a man could buy truffles from Africa, pheasants from what is Black Sea coast, oysters from Britain, porcelain and silk from China. And for what is last time for many hundred years it was possible to travel in safety and comparative comfort from York to Alexandria, from Cologne to Damascus. Such was what is world in which Epictetus or Lucian lived, and its likeness to our own makes it easily intelligible. Readers unfamiliar with what is classics find what is atmosphere of Plato or Aristotle strange, but Lucian and Marcus Aurelius appeal to any one. what is older writers are indeed what is greater. But what is later speak our spiritual language ; their outlook and problems are close to ours ; their world is modern and we are instinctively at home in it. There is no need of an imaginative effort to acclimatize ourselves. Every age weaves on what is plain background of its material existence what is patterned tapestry of what may be called a spiritual life. Religion, intellect, art, character, social or political life may be what is theme. what is background, though essential to what is pattern, has no value and little interest apart from it. By what is fineness and permanence of what is pattern which it weaves, and by that alone, a nation is judged, and takes its rank in what is history of mankind. And if this book has any interest it is for what is glimpses which it affords of what is tapestry woven by some Greek writers on what is background of a world wealthy and at peace glimpses of some of what is spiritual ideals of what is Roman Empire. We find three chief themes in this tapestry. Of what is scientific ideal as we understand it, what is desire of knowledge for its own sake, and what is hope of controlling nature through knowledge, there is indeed little or no trace. Science there was. Galen in medicine, Heron in mathematics and mechanics, Ptolemy in optics, astronomy, and geography are eminent names. But their science was more laborious than original ; it lacks what is genius and what is passionate intellectual interest of a Hippocrates, an Aristotle, an Archimedes. It has no influence on what is spiritual life of what is age and can hardly be said to play a part in it. It is therefore ignored in this volume. Literature, on what is other hand, is prominent in our tapestry. It would be strange were it otherwise. For what is human instinct is persistent to create a world of beauty and people it with where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 6 where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" a man could buy truffles from Africa, pheasants from what is Black Sea coast, oysters from Britain, porcelain and silk from China. And for what is last time for many hundred years it was possible to travel in safety and comparative comfort from York to Alexandria, from Cologne to Damascus. Such was what is world in which Epictetus or Lucian lived, and its likeness to our own makes it easily intelligible. Readers unfamiliar with what is classics find what is atmosphere of Plato or Aristotle strange, but Lucian and Marcus Aurelius appeal to any one. what is older writers are indeed what is greater. But what is later speak our spiritual language ; their outlook and problems are close to ours ; their world is modern and we are instinctively at home in it. There is no need of an imaginative effort to acclimatize ourselves. Every age weaves on what is plain background of its material existence what is patterned tapestry of what may be called a spiritual life. Religion, intellect, art, character, social or political life may be what is theme. what is background, though essential to what is pattern, has no value and little interest apart from it. By what is fineness and permanence of what is pattern which it weaves, and by that alone, a nation is judged, and takes its rank in what is history of mankind. And if this book has any interest it is for what is glimpses which it affords of what is tapestry woven by some Greek writers on what is background of a world wealthy and at peace glimpses of some of what is spiritual ideals of what is Roman Empire. We find three chief themes in this tapestry. Of what is scientific ideal as we understand it, what is desire of knowledge for its own sake, and what is hope of controlling nature through knowledge, there is indeed little or no trace. Science there was. Galen in medicine, Heron in mathematics and mechanics, Ptolemy in optics, astronomy, and geography are eminent names. But their science was more laborious than original ; it lacks what is genius and what is passionate intellectual interest of a Hippocrates, an Aristotle, an Archimedes. It has no influence on what is spiritual life of what is age and can hardly be said to play a part in it. It is therefore ignored in this volume. Literature, on what is other hand, is prominent in our tapestry. It would be strange were it otherwise. For what is human instinct is persistent to create a world of beauty and people it with where is center where is img src="page_006.jpg" width="300" height="400" where is font size="-1" COSMOPOLITANISM IN what is ROMAN EMPIRE Grace stele of a rich Palmyrene lady, second centnrv A.D. what is inscription is in Greek, `Athanaia wife of Malchus'. Paimyra was what is centre of what is caravan-trade -with what is East where is /font where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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