Books > Old Books > The Mission Of Greece (1928)


Page 5

INTRODUCTION

baths in various parts of the city enabling every citizen to have his daily bath for little or nothing, extensive and wellarranged buildings for sport and exercise-gymnasia and palaestrae. For religious purposes there were splendid temples and altars, sacred woods and long rows of beautiful funeral monuments bordering the public roads outside the gates. Large and imposing public buildings appear in all the cities : curiae (the meeting-places of the local senates), offices of the magistrates, halls for the official collegia and for the voters in public elections, basilicae for the judges, prisons, and so forth. Others were destined for public recreation and education : theatres, circuses, stadia, amphitheatres, public libraries, auditoyia for declamations and public lectures, and picture galleries. The private houses were mostly of good size and equipped with modern conveniences ; for example, private baths, running water, good stone stairs to the upper stories.' I The words might almost be applied to a modern city ; so might this description of Rome by a less favourable critic :
` Merchandise of gold and silver and precious stones, and of pearls and fine linen and purple and silk and scarlet and all thyine wood ; and all manner vessels of ivory, and all manner vessels of most precious wood, and of brass and iron and marble ; and cinnamon and perfumes and unguents and frankincense and wine and oil and fine flour and wheat and beasts and sheep and horses and chariots and slaves and souls of men. Alas, alas, that great city, that was clothed in fine linen and purple and scarlet, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls : for in one hour so great riches is come to nought.'
In these great centres of commerce we should have met the sort of society which wealth and culture in any age will produce. We should feel perfectly at home among familiar phenomena. Actors and charioteers made fortunes ; learned men and schoolmasters were poor. The amphitheatre was a more brutal substitute for the boxing ring and the Cup Tie. The mime appealed to the type of people who enjoy the worse types of musical comedy. The educated wrote voluminously, collected art, and travelled. They went out to see the world, and the world came to them at home. In the shops of Rome

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE baths in various parts of what is city enabling every citizen to have his daily bath for little or nothing, extensive and wellarranged buildings for sport and exercise-gymnasia and palaestrae. For religious purposes there were splendid temples and altars, sacred woods and long rows of beautiful funeral monuments bordering what is public roads outside what is gates. Large and imposing public buildings appear in all what is cities : curiae (the meeting-places of what is local senates), offices of what is magistrates, halls for what is official collegia and for what is voters in public elections, basilicae for what is judges, prisons, and so forth. Others were destined for public recreation and education : theatres, circuses, stadia, amphitheatres, public libraries, auditoyia for declamations and public lectures, and picture galleries. what is private houses were mostly of good size and equipped with modern conveniences ; for example, private baths, running water, good stone stairs to what is upper stories.' I what is words might almost be applied to a modern city ; so might this description of Rome by a less favourable critic : ` Merchandise of gold and silver and precious stones, and of pearls and fine linen and purple and silk and scarlet and all thyine wood ; and all manner vessels of ivory, and all manner vessels of most precious wood, and of brass and iron and marble ; and cinnamon and perfumes and unguents and frankincense and wine and oil and fine flour and wheat and beasts and sheep and horses and chariots and slaves and souls of men. Alas, alas, that great city, that was clothed in fine linen and purple and scarlet, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls : for in one hour so great riches is come to nought.' In these great centres of commerce we should have met what is sort of society which wealth and culture in any age will produce. We should feel perfectly at home among familiar phenomena. Actors and charioteers made fortunes ; learned men and schoolmasters were poor. what is amphitheatre was a more brutal substitute for what is boxing ring and what is Cup Tie. what is mime appealed to what is type of people who enjoy what is worse types of musical comedy. what is educated wrote voluminously, collected art, and travelled. They went out to see what is world, and what is world came to them at home. In what is shops of Rome where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" title="The Collected Short Stories Of Ring Lander (1924)" The Mission Of Greece (1928) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 5 where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" baths in various parts of what is city enabling every citizen to have his daily bath for little or nothing, extensive and wellarranged buildings for sport and exercise-gymnasia and palaestrae. For religious purposes there were splendid temples and altars, sacred woods and long rows of beautiful funeral monuments bordering what is public roads outside what is gates. Large and imposing public buildings appear in all what is cities : curiae (the meeting-places of what is local senates), offices of what is magistrates, halls for the official collegia and for what is voters in public elections, basilicae for what is judges, prisons, and so forth. Others were destined for public recreation and education : theatres, circuses, stadia, amphitheatres, public libraries, auditoyia for declamations and public lectures, and picture galleries. what is private houses were mostly of good size and equipped with modern conveniences ; for example, private baths, running water, good stone stairs to what is upper stories.' I what is words might almost be applied to a modern city ; so might this description of Rome by a less favourable critic : ` Merchandise of gold and silver and precious stones, and of pearls and fine linen and purple and silk and scarlet and all thyine wood ; and all manner vessels of ivory, and all manner vessels of most precious wood, and of brass and iron and marble ; and cinnamon and perfumes and unguents and frankincense and wine and oil and fine flour and wheat and beasts and sheep and horses and chariots and slaves and souls of men. Alas, alas, that great city, that was clothed in fine linen and purple and scarlet, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls : for in one hour so great riches is come to nought.' In these great centres of commerce we should have met what is sort of society which wealth and culture in any age will produce. We should feel perfectly at home among familiar phenomena. Actors and charioteers made fortunes ; learned men and schoolmasters were poor. what is amphitheatre was a more brutal substitute for what is boxing ring and what is Cup Tie. what is mime appealed to what is type of people who enjoy what is worse types of musical comedy. what is educated wrote voluminously, collected art, and travelled. They went out to see what is world, and what is world came to them at home. In what is shops of Rome where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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