Books > Old Books > Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950)


Page 244

CHAPTER TEN - THE DUCHESS AND THE DEVIL

of her canted deck now. He could see human figures cowering under the break of the poop. He saw somebody there wave an arm to him. Next moment his attention was called away when a jagged monster suddenly leaped out of the sea twenty yards ahead. For a second he could not imagine what it was, and then it leaped clear again and he recognized it - the butt end of a broken mast. The mast was still anchored to the ship by a single surviving shroud attached to the upper end of the mast and to the ship, and the mast, drifting down to leeward, was jerking and leaping on the waves as though some sea god below the surface was threatening them with his wrath. Hornblower called the steersman's attention to the menace and received a nod in return; the steersman's shouted 'Nombre de Dios' was whirled away in the wind. They kept clear of the mast, and as they pulled up along it Hornblower could form a clearer notion of the speed of their progress now that he had a stationary object to help his judgement. He could see the painful inches gained at each frantic tug on the oars, and could see how the boat stopped dead or even went astern when the wilder gusts hit her, the oar blades pulling ineffectively through the water. Every inch of gain was only won at the cost of an infinity of labour.
Now they were past the mast, close to the submerged bows of the ship, and close enough to the Devil's Teeth to be deluged with spray as each wave burst on the farther side of the reef. There were inches of water washing back and forth in the bottom of the boat, but there was neither time nor opportunity to bale it out. This was the trickiest part of the whole effort, to get close enough alongside the wreck to be able to take off the survivors without stoving in the boat; there were wicked fangs of rock all about the after end of the wreck, while forward, although the forecastle was above the surface at times the forward part of the waist was submerged. But the ship was canted a little over to port, towards them, which made the approach easier. When the water was at its lowest level, immediately before the next roller broke on the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of her canted deck now. He could see human figures cowering under what is break of what is poop. He saw somebody there wave an arm to him. Next moment his attention was called away when a jagged big suddenly leaped out of what is sea twenty yards ahead. For a second he could not imagine what it was, and then it leaped clear again and he recognized it - what is butt end of a broken mast. what is mast was still anchored to what is ship by a single surviving shroud attached to what is upper end of what is mast and to what is ship, and what is mast, drifting down to leeward, was jerking and leaping on what is waves as though some sea god below what is surface was threatening them with his wrath. Hornblower called what is steersman's attention to what is menace and received a nod in return; what is steersman's shouted 'Nombre de Dios' was whirled away in what is wind. They kept clear of what is mast, and as they pulled up along it Hornblower could form a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 244 where is strong CHAPTER TEN - what is DUCHESS AND what is fun where is p align="justify" of her canted deck now. He could see human figures cowering under what is break of what is poop. He saw somebody there wave an arm to him. Next moment his attention was called away when a jagged big suddenly leaped out of what is sea twenty yards ahead. For a second he could not imagine what it was, and then it leaped clear again and he recognized it - what is butt end of a broken mast. what is mast was still anchored to what is ship by a single surviving shroud attached to what is upper end of what is mast and to what is ship, and what is mast, drifting down to leeward, was jerking and leaping on what is waves as though some sea god below what is surface was threatening them with his wrath. Hornblower called what is steersman's attention to what is menace and received a nod in return; what is steersman's shouted 'Nombre de Dios' was whirled away in what is wind. They kept clear of what is mast, and as they pulled up along it Hornblower could form a clearer notion of what is speed of their progress now that he had a stationary object to help his judgement. He could see what is painful inches gained at each frantic tug on what is oars, and could see how what is boat stopped dead or even went astern when what is wilder gusts hit her, what is oar blades pulling ineffectively through what is water. Every inch of gain was only won at what is cost of an infinity of labour. Now they were past what is mast, close to what is submerged bows of the ship, and close enough to what is fun 's Teeth to be deluged with spray as each wave burst on what is farther side of what is reef. There were inches of water washing back and forth in what is bottom of the boat, but there was neither time nor opportunity to bale it out. This was what is trickiest part of what is whole effort, to get close enough alongside what is wreck to be able to take off what is survivors without stoving in what is boat; there were wicked fangs of rock all about what is after end of what is wreck, while forward, although the forecastle was above what is surface at times what is forward part of what is waist was submerged. But what is ship was canted a little over to port, towards them, which made what is approach easier. When the water was at its lowest level, immediately before what is next roller broke on what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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