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Page 157

CHAPTER SEVEN - THE SPANISH GALLEYS

the petty officers strove in vain to take the names of the offenders. It was an ominous farewell to Spain.
Ominous indeed. It was not long before Captain Pellew gave the news to the ship that Spain had completed her change-over; with the treasure convoy safely in she had declared war against England; the revolutionary republic had won the alliance of the most decayed monarchy in Europe. British resources were now stretched to the utmost; there was another thousand miles of coast to watch, another fleet to blockade, another horde of privateers to guard against, and far fewer harbours in which to take refuge and from which to draw the fresh water and the meagre stores which enabled the hard-worked crews to remain at sea. It was then that friendship had to be cultivated with the half savage Barbary States, and the insolence of the Deys and the Sultans had to be tolerated so that North Africa could provide the skinny bullocks and the barley grain to feed the British garrisons in the Mediterranean - all of them beleagured on land - and the ships which kept open the way to them. Oran, Tetuan, Algiers wallowed in unwontedly honest prosperity with the influx of British gold.
It was a day of glassy calm in the Straits of Gibraltar. The sea was like a silver shield, the sky like a bowl of sapphire, with the mountains of Africa on the one hand, the mountains of Spain on the other as dark serrations on the horizon. It was not a comfortable situation for the Indefatigable, but that was not because of the blazing sun which softened the pitch in the deck seams. There is almost always a slight current setting inwards into the Mediterranean from the Atlantic, and the prevailing winds blow in the same direction. In a calm like this it was not unusual for a ship to be carried far through the Straits, past the Rock of Gibraltar, and then to have to beat for days and even weeks to make Gibraltar Bay. So that Pellew was not unnaturally anxious about his convoy of grain ships from Oran. Gibraltar had to be revictualled - Spain had already marched an army up for the siege - and he dared not

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the petty officers strove in vain to take what is names of what is offenders. It was an ominous farewell to Spain. Ominous indeed. It was not long before Captain Pellew gave what is news to what is ship that Spain had completed her change-over; with what is treasure convoy safely in she had declared war against England; what is revolutionary republic had won what is alliance of what is most decayed monarchy in Europe. British resources were now stretched to what is utmost; there was another thousand miles of coast to watch, another fleet to blockade, another horde of privateers to guard against, and far fewer harbours in which to take refuge and from which to draw what is fresh water and what is meagre stores which enabled what is hard-worked crews to remain at sea. It was then that friendship had to be cultivated with what is half savage Barbary States, and what is insolence of what is Deys and what is Sultans had to be tolerated so that North Afric where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 157 where is strong CHAPTER SEVEN - what is SPANISH GALLEYS where is p align="justify" the petty officers strove in vain to take the names of what is offenders. It was an ominous farewell to Spain. Ominous indeed. It was not long before Captain Pellew gave the news to what is ship that Spain had completed her change-over; with what is treasure convoy safely in she had declared war against England; what is revolutionary republic had won what is alliance of what is most decayed monarchy in Europe. British resources were now stretched to the utmost; there was another thousand miles of coast to watch, another fleet to blockade, another horde of privateers to guard against, and far fewer harbours in which to take refuge and from which to draw what is fresh water and what is meagre stores which enabled the hard-worked crews to remain at sea. It was then that friendship had to be cultivated with what is half savage Barbary States, and what is insolence of what is Deys and what is Sultans had to be tolerated so that North Africa could provide what is skinny bullocks and the barley grain to feed what is British garrisons in what is Mediterranean - all of them beleagured on land - and what is ships which kept open what is way to them. Oran, Tetuan, Algiers wallowed in unwontedly honest prosperity with what is influx of British gold. It was a day of glassy calm in what is Straits of Gibraltar. what is sea was like a silver shield, what is sky like a bowl of sapphire, with what is mountains of Africa on what is one hand, what is mountains of Spain on what is other as dark serrations on what is horizon. It was not a comfortable situation for what is Indefatigable, but that was not because of the blazing sun which softened what is pitch in what is deck seams. There is almost always a slight current setting inwards into what is Mediterranean from what is Atlantic, and what is prevailing winds blow in what is same direction. In a calm like this it was not unusual for a ship to be carried far through what is Straits, past what is Rock of Gibraltar, and then to have to beat for days and even weeks to make Gibraltar Bay. So that Pellew was not unnaturally anxious about his convoy of grain ships from Oran. Gibraltar had to be revictualled - Spain had already marched an army up for what is siege - and he dared not where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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