Books > Old Books > Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950)


Page 136

CHAPTER SIX - THE FROGS AND THE LOBSTERS

to breakfast. Hornblower took his cup and a piece of bread - for four months before this his only bread had been ship's biscuit - and sipped at the stuff. He was not sure if he liked it; he had only tasted coffee three or four times before. But the second time he raised his cup to his lips he did not sip; before he could do so, the distant boom of a cannon made him lower his cup and stand stock still. The cannon shot was repeated, and again, and then it was echoed by a sharper, nearer note - Midshipman Bracegirdle's six-pounders on the causeway.
In the kitchen there was instant stir and bustle. Somebody knocked a cup over and sent a river of black liquid swirling across the table. Somebody else managed to catch his spurs together so that he stumbled into somebody else's arms. Everyone seemed to be speaking at once. Hornblower was as excited as the rest of them; he wanted to rush out and see what was happening, but he thought at that moment of the disciplined calm which he had seen in H.M.S. Indefatigable as she went into action. He was not of this breed of Frenchmen, and to prove it he made himself put his cup to his lips again and drink calmly. Already most of the staff had dashed out of the kitchen shouting for their horses. It would take time to saddle up; he met Pouzauges' eye as the latter strode up and down the kitchen, and drained his cup - a trifle too hot for comfort, but he felt it was a good gesture. There was bread to eat, and he made himself bite and chew and swallow, although
he had no appetite; if he was to be in the field all day, he could not tell when he would get his next meal, and so he crammed a half loaf into his pocket.
The horses were being brought into the yard and saddled; the excitement had infected them, and they plunged and sidled about amid the curses of the officers. Pouzauges leapt up into his saddle and clattered away with the rest of the staff behind him, leaving behind only a single soldier holding Hornblower's roan. That was as it had better be - Hornblower knew that he would not keep his seat for half a minute if the horse took it into his head to plunge or rear. He

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to breakfast. Hornblower took his cup and a piece of bread - for four months before this his only bread had been ship's biscuit - and sipped at what is stuff. He was not sure if he liked it; he had only tasted coffee three or four times before. But what is second time he raised his cup to his lips he did not sip; before he could do so, what is distant boom of a cannon made him lower his cup and stand stock still. what is cannon shot was repeated, and again, and then it was echoed by a sharper, nearer note - Midshipman Bracegirdle's six-pounders on what is causeway. In what is kitchen there was instant stir and bustle. Somebody knocked a cup over and sent a river of black liquid swirling across what is table. Somebody else managed to catch his spurs together so that he stumbled into somebody else's arms. Everyone seemed to be speaking at once. Hornblower was as excited as what is rest of them; he wanted to rush out and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 136 where is strong CHAPTER SIX - what is FROGS AND what is LOBSTERS where is p align="justify" to breakfast. Hornblower took his cup and a piece of bread - for four months before this his only bread had been ship's biscuit - and sipped at what is stuff. He was not sure if he liked it; he had only tasted coffee three or four times before. But what is second time he raised his cup to his lips he did not sip; before he could do so, what is distant boom of a cannon made him lower his cup and stand stock still. what is cannon shot was repeated, and again, and then it was echoed by a sharper, nearer note - Midshipman Bracegirdle's six-pounders on what is causeway. In what is kitchen there was instant stir and bustle. Somebody knocked a cup over and sent a river of black liquid swirling across the table. Somebody else managed to catch his spurs together so that he stumbled into somebody else's arms. Everyone seemed to be speaking at once. Hornblower was as excited as what is rest of them; he wanted to rush out and see what was happening, but he thought at that moment of what is disciplined calm which he had seen in H.M.S. Indefatigable as she went into action. He was not of this breed of Frenchmen, and to prove it he made himself put his cup to his lips again and drink calmly. Already most of what is staff had dashed out of what is kitchen shouting for their horses. It would take time to saddle up; he met Pouzauges' eye as what is latter strode up and down the kitchen, and drained his cup - a trifle too hot for comfort, but he felt it was a good gesture. There was bread to eat, and he made himself bite and chew and swallow, although he had no appetite; if he was to be in what is field all day, he could not tell when he would get his next meal, and so he crammed a half loaf into his pocket. what is horses were being brought into what is yard and saddled; what is excitement had infected them, and they plunged and sidled about amid what is curses of what is officers. Pouzauges leapt up into his saddle and clattered away with what is rest of what is staff behind him, leaving behind only a single soldier holding Hornblower's roan. That was as it had better be - Hornblower knew that he would not keep his seat for half a minute if what is horse took it into his head to plunge or rear. He where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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