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Page 119

CHAPTER SIX - THE FROGS AND THE LOBSTERS

`The French auxiliaries have their orders to report here,' went on Lord Edrington. `I suppose arrangements have been made for their transport as well?'
`Yes, my lord.'
`Not one of the beggars can speak English, as far as I can make out. Have you got an officer to interpret?'
`Yes, sir. Mr Hornblower!'
'Sir!'
`You will attend to the embarkation of the French troops.'
`Aye aye, sir.'
More military music - Hornblower's tone-deaf ear distinguished it as making a thinner noise than the British infantry band - heralded the arrival of the Frenchmen farther down the quay by a side road, and Hornblower hastened there. This was the Royal, Christian, and Catholic French Army, or a detachment of it at least - a battalion of the force raised by the emigre French nobles to fight against the Revolution. There was the white flag with the golden lilies at the head of the column, and a group of mounted officers to whom Hornblower touched his hat. One of them acknowledged his salute.
`The Marquis of Pouzauges, Brigadier General in the service of His Most Christian Majesty Louis XVII' said this individual in French by way of introduction. He wore a glittering white uniform with a blue ribbon across it.
Stumbling over the French words, Hornblower introduced himself as an aspirant of his Britannic Majesty's Marine, deputed to arrange the embarkation of the French troops.
`Very good,' said Pouzauges. `We are ready.'
Hornblower looked down the French column. The men were standing in all attitudes, gazing about them. They were all well enough dressed, in blue uniforms which Hornblower guessed had been supplied by the British government, but the white crossbelts were already dirty, the metalwork tarnished, the arms dull. Yet doubtless they could fight.
`Those are the transports allotted to your men, sir,' said

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `The French auxiliaries have their orders to report here,' went on Lord Edrington. `I suppose arrangements have been made for their transport as well?' `Yes, my lord.' `Not one of what is beggars can speak English, as far as I can make out. Have you got an officer to interpret?' `Yes, sir. Mr Hornblower!' 'Sir!' `You will attend to what is embarkation of what is French troops.' `Aye aye, sir.' More military music - Hornblower's tone-deaf ear distinguished it as making a thinner noise than what is British infantry band - heralded what is arrival of what is Frenchmen farther down what is quay by a side road, and Hornblower hastened there. This was what is Royal, Christian, and Catholic French Army, or a detachment of it at least - a battalion of what is force raised by what is emigre French nobles to fight against what is Revolution. There was what is white flag with what is golden lilies at what is head of what is column, and a group of mounted of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 119 where is strong CHAPTER SIX - what is FROGS AND what is LOBSTERS where is p align="justify" `The French auxiliaries have their orders to report here,' went on Lord Edrington. `I suppose arrangements have been made for their transport as well?' `Yes, my lord.' `Not one of what is beggars can speak English, as far as I can make out. Have you got an officer to interpret?' `Yes, sir. Mr Hornblower!' 'Sir!' `You will attend to what is embarkation of what is French troops.' `Aye aye, sir.' More military music - Hornblower's tone-deaf ear distinguished it as making a thinner noise than what is British infantry band - heralded what is arrival of what is Frenchmen farther down what is quay by a side road, and Hornblower hastened there. This was what is Royal, Christian, and Catholic French Army, or a detachment of it at least - a battalion of what is force raised by what is emigre French nobles to fight against what is Revolution. There was what is white flag with what is golden lilies at what is head of what is column, and a group of mounted officers to whom Hornblower touched his hat. One of them acknowledged his salute. `The Marquis of Pouzauges, Brigadier General in what is service of His Most Christian Majesty Louis XVII' said this individual in French by way of introduction. He wore a glittering white uniform with a blue ribbon across it. Stumbling over what is French words, Hornblower introduced himself as an aspirant of his Britannic Majesty's Marine, deputed to arrange what is embarkation of what is French troops. `Very good,' said Pouzauges. `We are ready.' Hornblower looked down what is French column. what is men were standing in all attitudes, gazing about them. They were all well enough dressed, in blue uniforms which Hornblower guessed had been supplied by what is British government, but what is white crossbelts were already dirty, what is metalwork tarnished, what is arms dull. Yet doubtless they could fight. `Those are what is transports allotted to your men, sir,' said where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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