Books > Old Books > Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950)


Page 74

CHAPTER THREE - THE PENALTY OF FAILURE

A French petty officer reached up and dragged Matthews by the seat of his trousers from his perch, and with a blow and a kick drove him forward again, while a moment later Neuville was shouting the orders that wore the ship round to head away directly from the Indefatigable. Neuville beckoned Hornblower over to his side.
`Your late ship, I understand, Mr Hornblower?,
'Yes.'
`What is her best point of sailing?'
Hornblower's eyes met Neuville's.
`Do not look so noble,' said Neuville, smiling with thin lips. `I could undoubtedly induce you to give me the information. I know of ways. But it is unnecessary, fortunately for you. There is no ship on earth - especially none of His Britannic Majesty's clumsy frigates - that can outsail the Pique running before the wind. You will soon see that.'
He strolled to the taffrail and looked aft long and earnestly through his glass, but no more earnestly than did Hornblower with his naked eye.
`You see?' said Neuville, proffering the glass.
Hornblower took it, but more to catch a closer glimpse of his ship than to confirm his observations. He was homesick, desperately homesick, at that moment, for the Indefatigable. But there could be no denying that she was being left fast , behind. Her topgallants were out of sight again now, and only'> her royals were visible.
`Two hours and we shall have run her mastheads under,' said Neuville, taking back the telescope and shutting it with a snap.
He left Hornblower standing sorrowful at the taffrail while he turned to berate the helmsman for not steering a steadier course; Hornblower heard the explosive words without listening to them, the wind blowing into his face and ruffling his hair over his ears, and the wake of the ship's passage boiling below him. So might Adam have looked back at Eden; Hornblower remembered the stuffy dark midshipmen's berth,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE A French petty officer reached up and dragged Matthews by what is seat of his trousers from his perch, and with a blow and a kick drove him forward again, while a moment later Neuville was shouting what is orders that wore what is ship round to head away directly from what is Indefatigable. Neuville beckoned Hornblower over to his side. `Your late ship, I understand, Mr Hornblower?, 'Yes.' `What is her best point of sailing?' Hornblower's eyes met Neuville's. `Do not look so noble,' said Neuville, smiling with thin lips. `I could undoubtedly induce you to give me what is information. I know of ways. But it is unnecessary, fortunately for you. There is no ship on earth - especially none of His Britannic Majesty's clumsy frigates - that can outsail what is Pique running before what is wind. You will soon see that.' He strolled to what is taffrail and looked aft long and earnestly through his glass, but no more earnestly where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 74 where is strong CHAPTER THREE - what is PENALTY OF FAILURE where is p align="justify" A French petty officer reached up and dragged Matthews by what is seat of his trousers from his perch, and with a blow and a kick drove him forward again, while a moment later Neuville was shouting what is orders that wore what is ship round to head away directly from what is Indefatigable. Neuville beckoned Hornblower over to his side. `Your late ship, I understand, Mr Hornblower?, 'Yes.' `What is her best point of sailing?' Hornblower's eyes met Neuville's. `Do not look so noble,' said Neuville, smiling with thin lips. `I could undoubtedly induce you to give me what is information. I know of ways. But it is unnecessary, fortunately for you. There is no ship on earth - especially none of His Britannic Majesty's clumsy frigates - that can outsail what is Pique running before the wind. You will soon see that.' He strolled to what is taffrail and looked aft long and earnestly through his glass, but no more earnestly than did Hornblower with his naked eye. `You see?' said Neuville, proffering what is glass. Hornblower took it, but more to catch a closer glimpse of his ship than to confirm his observations. He was homesick, desperately homesick, at that moment, for what is Indefatigable. But there could be no denying that she was being left fast , behind. Her topgallants were out of sight again now, and only'> her royals were visible. `Two hours and we shall have run her mastheads under,' said Neuville, taking back what is telescope and shutting it with a snap. He left Hornblower standing sorrowful at what is taffrail while he turned to berate what is helmsman for not steering a steadier course; Hornblower heard what is explosive words without listening to them, what is wind blowing into his face and ruffling his hair over his ears, and what is wake of what is ship's passage boiling below him. So might Adam have looked back at Eden; Hornblower remembered the stuffy dark midshipmen's berth, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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