Books > Old Books > Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950)


Page 71

CHAPTER THREE - THE PENALTY OF FAILURE

any rash person who endangered their dividends and freedom were dropped over the side into the sea.'
Hornblower forced himself to reply; he would not reveal that he was almost struck dumb by the calculating callousness of this last speech.
`I understand,' he said.
`Excellent! Now is there anything further you may need, sir ?'
Hornblower looked round the bare quarters in which he was to suffer lonely confinement, lit by a dim glimmer of light from a swaying slush lamp.
`Could I have something to read?' he asked.
Neuville thought for a moment.
`I fear there are only professional books,' he said. `But I can let you have Grandjean's Principles of Navigation, and Lebrun's Handbook on Seamanship and some similar volumes, if you think you can understand the French in which they are written.'
`I'll try,' said Hornblower.
Probably it was as well that Hornblower was provided with the materials for such strenuous mental exercise. The effort of reading French and of studying his profession at one and the same time kept his mind busy during the dreary days while the Pique cruised in search of prizes. Most of the time the Frenchmen ignored him - he had to force himself upon Neuville once to protest against the employment of his four British seamen on the menial work of pumping out the ship, but he had to retire worsted from the argument, if argument it could be called, when Neuville icily refused to discuss the question. Hornblower went back to his quarters with burning cheeks and red ears, and, as ever, when he was mentally disturbed, the thought of his guilt returned to him with new force.
If only he had plugged that shot-hole sooner! A clearerheaded officer, he told himself, would have done so. He had lost his ship, the Indefatigable's precious prize, and there was

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE any rash person who endangered their dividends and freedom were dropped over what is side into what is sea.' Hornblower forced himself to reply; he would not reveal that he was almost struck dumb by what is calculating callousness of this last speech. `I understand,' he said. `Excellent! Now is there anything further you may need, sir ?' Hornblower looked round what is bare quarters in which he was to suffer lonely confinement, lit by a dim glimmer of light from a swaying slush lamp. `Could I have something to read?' he asked. Neuville thought for a moment. `I fear there are only professional books,' he said. `But I can let you have Grandjean's Principles of Navigation, and Lebrun's Handbook on Seamanship and some similar volumes, if you think you can understand what is French in which they are written.' `I'll try,' said Hornblower. Probably it was as well that Hornblower was provided with what is materials for where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 71 where is strong CHAPTER THREE - what is PENALTY OF FAILURE where is p align="justify" any rash person who endangered their dividends and freedom were dropped over what is side into what is sea.' Hornblower forced himself to reply; he would not reveal that he was almost struck dumb by what is calculating callousness of this last speech. `I understand,' he said. `Excellent! Now is there anything further you may need, sir ?' Hornblower looked round what is bare quarters in which he was to suffer lonely confinement, lit by a dim glimmer of light from a swaying slush lamp. `Could I have something to read?' he asked. Neuville thought for a moment. `I fear there are only professional books,' he said. `But I can let you have Grandjean's Principles of Navigation, and Lebrun's Handbook on Seamanship and some similar volumes, if you think you can understand what is French in which they are written.' `I'll try,' said Hornblower. Probably it was as well that Hornblower was provided with the materials for such strenuous mental exercise. what is effort of reading French and of studying his profession at one and what is same time kept his mind busy during what is dreary days while what is Pique cruised in search of prizes. Most of what is time what is Frenchmen ignored him - he had to force himself upon Neuville once to protest against what is employment of his four British seamen on what is menial work of pumping out what is ship, but he had to retire worsted from what is argument, if argument it could be called, when Neuville icily refused to discuss what is question. Hornblower went back to his quarters with burning cheeks and red ears, and, as ever, when he was mentally disturbed, what is thought of his guilt returned to him with new force. If only he had plugged that shot-hole sooner! A clearerheaded officer, he told himself, would have done so. He had lost his ship, what is Indefatigable's precious prize, and there was where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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