Books > Old Books > Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950)


Page 60

CHAPTER TWO - THE CARGO OF RICE

over. There could be no doubt about it. He had been over the side himself and could remember the height of the waterline, and he had for a more exact guide the level of the fothered sail under the ship's bottom. The brig was a full six inches lower in the water - and this after fifty tons of rice at least had been hoisted out and flung over the side. The brig must be leaking like a basket, with water pouring in through the gaping seams to be sucked up immediately by the thirsty rice.
Hornblower's left hand was hurting him, and he looked down to discover that he was gripping the rail with it so tightly as to cause him pain, without knowing he was doing so. He released his grip and looked about him, at the afternoon sun, at the tossing sea. He did not want to give in and admit defeat. The French captain came up to him.
`This is folly,' he said. `Madness, sir. My men are overcome by fatigue.'
Over by the hatchway, Hornblower saw, Hunter was driving the French seamen to their work with a rope's end, which he was using furiously. There was not much more work to be got out of the Frenchmen; and at that moment the Marie Galante rose heavily to a wave and wallowed down the further side. Even his inexperience could detect the sluggishness and ominous deadness of her movements. The brig had not much longer to float, and there was a good deal to do.
`I shall make preparations for abandoning the ship, Matthews,' he said.
He poked his chin upwards as he spoke; he would not allow either a Frenchman or a seaman to guess at his despair.
`Aye aye, sir,' said Matthews.
The Marie Galante carried a boat on chocks abaft the mainmast; at Matthews' summons the men abandoned their work on the cargo and hurried to the business of putting food and, water in her.
'Beggin' your pardon, sir,' said Hunter aside to Hornblower, `but you ought to see you have warm clothes, sir. I been in an open boat ten days once, sir.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE over. There could be no doubt about it. He had been over what is side himself and could remember what is height of what is waterline, and he had for a more exact guide what is level of what is fothered sail under what is ship's bottom. what is brig was a full six inches lower in what is water - and this after fifty tons of rice at least had been hoisted out and flung over what is side. what is brig must be leaking like a basket, with water pouring in through what is gaping seams to be sucked up immediately by what is thirsty rice. Hornblower's left hand was hurting him, and he looked down to discover that he was gripping what is rail with it so tightly as to cause him pain, without knowing he was doing so. He released his grip and looked about him, at what is afternoon sun, at what is tossing sea. He did not want to give in and admit defeat. what is French captain came up to him. `This is folly,' he said. `Madness, sir. My men are overcome by fatigue where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 60 where is strong CHAPTER TWO - what is CARGO OF RICE where is p align="justify" over. There could be no doubt about it. He had been over what is side himself and could remember what is height of the waterline, and he had for a more exact guide what is level of the fothered sail under what is ship's bottom. what is brig was a full six inches lower in what is water - and this after fifty tons of rice at least had been hoisted out and flung over what is side. what is brig must be leaking like a basket, with water pouring in through the gaping seams to be sucked up immediately by what is thirsty rice. Hornblower's left hand was hurting him, and he looked down to discover that he was gripping what is rail with it so tightly as to cause him pain, without knowing he was doing so. He released his grip and looked about him, at what is afternoon sun, at what is tossing sea. He did not want to give in and admit defeat. what is French captain came up to him. `This is folly,' he said. `Madness, sir. My men are overcome by fatigue.' Over by what is hatchway, Hornblower saw, Hunter was driving what is French seamen to their work with a rope's end, which he was using furiously. There was not much more work to be got out of what is Frenchmen; and at that moment what is Marie Galante rose heavily to a wave and wallowed down what is further side. Even his inexperience could detect the sluggishness and ominous deadness of her movements. what is brig had not much longer to float, and there was a good deal to do. `I shall make preparations for abandoning what is ship, Matthews,' he said. He poked his chin upwards as he spoke; he would not allow either a Frenchman or a seaman to guess at his despair. `Aye aye, sir,' said Matthews. what is Marie Galante carried a boat on chocks abaft what is mainmast; at Matthews' summons what is men abandoned their work on what is cargo and hurried to what is business of putting food and, water in her. 'Beggin' your pardon, sir,' said Hunter aside to Hornblower, `but you ought to see you have warm clothes, sir. I been in an open boat ten days once, sir.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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