Books > Old Books > Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950)


Page 58

CHAPTER TWO - THE CARGO OF RICE

settlin' down and she's opening up, I'm certain sure. Beg your pardon, sir, for saying so.'
Down below Hornblower had heard the fabric of the ship continuing to crack and complain; up here the deck seams were gaping more widely. There was a very likely explanation; the swelling of the rice must have forced open the ship's seams below water, so that plugging the shot-hole would have only eliminated what would be by now only a minor leak. Water must still be pouring in, the cargo still swelling, opening up the ship like an overblown flower. Ships were built to withstand blows from without, and there was nothing about their construction to resist an outward pressure. Wider and wider would gape the seams, and faster and faster the sea would gain access to the cargo.
'Look'e there, sir!' said Matthews suddenly.
In the broad light of day a small grey shape was hurrying along the weather scuppers; another one followed it and another after that. Rats! Something convulsive must be going on down below to bring them on deck in daytime, from out of their comfortable nests among the unlimited food of the cargo. The pressure must be enormous. Hornblower felt another small shock beneath his feet at that moment, as something further parted beneath them. But there was one more card to play, one last line of defence that he could think of.
`I'll jettison the cargo,' said Hornblower. He had never uttered that word in his life, but he had read it. `Get the prisoners and we'll start.'
The battened-down hatch cover was domed upwards curiously and significantly; as the wedges were knocked out one plank tore loose at one end with a crash, pointing diagonally upwards, and as the working party lifted off the cover a brown form followed it upwards - a bag of rice, forced out by the underlying pressure until it jammed in the hatchway.
`Tail onto those tackles and sway it up,' said Hornblower. Bag by bag the rice was hauled up from the hold; sometimes

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE settlin' down and she's opening up, I'm certain sure. Beg your pardon, sir, for saying so.' Down below Hornblower had heard what is fabric of what is ship continuing to crack and complain; up here what is deck seams were gaping more widely. There was a very likely explanation; what is swelling of what is rice must have forced open what is ship's seams below water, so that plugging what is shot-hole would have only eliminated what would be by now only a minor leak. Water must still be pouring in, what is cargo still swelling, opening up what is ship like an overblown flower. Ships were built to withstand blows from without, and there was nothing about their construction to resist an outward pressure. Wider and wider would gape what is seams, and faster and faster what is sea would gain access to what is cargo. 'Look'e there, sir!' said Matthews suddenly. In what is broad light of day a small grey shape was hurrying along what is weather scuppe where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 58 where is strong CHAPTER TWO - what is CARGO OF RICE where is p align="justify" settlin' down and she's opening up, I'm certain sure. Beg your pardon, sir, for saying so.' Down below Hornblower had heard what is fabric of what is ship continuing to crack and complain; up here what is deck seams were gaping more widely. There was a very likely explanation; what is swelling of the rice must have forced open what is ship's seams below water, so that plugging what is shot-hole would have only eliminated what would be by now only a minor leak. Water must still be pouring in, the cargo still swelling, opening up what is ship like an overblown flower. Ships were built to withstand blows from without, and there was nothing about their construction to resist an outward pressure. Wider and wider would gape what is seams, and faster and faster the sea would gain access to what is cargo. 'Look'e there, sir!' said Matthews suddenly. In what is broad light of day a small grey shape was hurrying along what is weather scuppers; another one followed it and another after that. Rats! Something convulsive must be going on down below to bring them on deck in daytime, from out of their comfortable nests among what is unlimited food of what is cargo. what is pressure must be enormous. Hornblower felt another small shock beneath his feet at that moment, as something further parted beneath them. But there was one more card to play, one last line of defence that he could think of. `I'll jettison what is cargo,' said Hornblower. He had never uttered that word in his life, but he had read it. `Get what is prisoners and we'll start.' what is battened-down hatch cover was domed upwards curiously and significantly; as what is wedges were knocked out one plank tore loose at one end with a crash, pointing diagonally upwards, and as the working party lifted off what is cover a brown form followed it upwards - a bag of rice, forced out by what is underlying pressure until it jammed in what is hatchway. `Tail onto those tackles and sway it up,' said Hornblower. Bag by bag what is rice was hauled up from what is hold; sometimes where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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