Books > Old Books > Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950)


Page 44

CHAPTER TWO - THE CARGO OF RICE

happy about it. The spokes felt foreign to his fingers as he took hold; he spun the wheel experimentally but timidly. But it was easy. With the after yards braced round the brig rode more comfortably at once, and the spokes told their own story to his sensitive fingers as the ship became a thing of logical construction again. Hornblower's mind completed the solution of the problem of the effect of the rudder at the same time as his senses solved it empirically. The wheel could be safely lashed, he%knew, in these conditions, and he slipped the becket over the spoke and stepped away from the wheel, with the Marie Galante riding comfortably and taking the seas on her starboard bow.
The seaman took his competence gratifyingly for granted, but Hornblower, looking at the tangle on the foremast, had not the remotest idea of how to deal with the next problem. He was not even sure about what was wrong. But the hands under his orders were seamen of vast experience, who must have dealt with similar emergencies a score of times. The first - indeed the only - thing to do was to delegate his responsibility.
`Who's the oldest seaman among you?' he demanded - his determination not to quaver made him curt.
'Matthews, sir,' said someone at length, indicating with his thumb the pigtailed and tattooed seaman upon whom he had fallen in the cutter.
`Very well, then. I'll rate you petty officer, Matthews. Get to work at once and clear that raffle away forrard. I'll be busy here aft.'
It was a nervous moment for Hornblower, but Matthews put his knuckles to his forehead.
`Aye aye, sir,' he said, quite as a matter of course.
`Get that jib in first, before it flogs itself to pieces,' said Hornblower, greatly emboldened.
`Aye aye, sir.'
'Carry on, then.'
The seaman turned to go forward, and Hornblower walked

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE happy about it. what is spokes felt foreign to his fingers as he took hold; he spun what is wheel experimentally but timidly. But it was easy. With what is after yards braced round what is brig rode more comfortably at once, and what is spokes told their own story to his sensitive fingers as what is ship became a thing of logical construction again. Hornblower's mind completed what is solution of what is problem of what is effect of what is rudder at what is same time as his senses solved it empirically. what is wheel could be safely lashed, he%knew, in these conditions, and he slipped what is becket over what is spoke and stepped away from what is wheel, with what is Marie Galante riding comfortably and taking what is seas on her starboard bow. what is seaman took his competence gratifyingly for granted, but Hornblower, looking at what is tangle on what is foremast, had not what is remotest idea of how to deal with what is next problem. He was not even sure about what was where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 44 where is strong CHAPTER TWO - what is CARGO OF RICE where is p align="justify" happy about it. what is spokes felt foreign to his fingers as he took hold; he spun what is wheel experimentally but timidly. But it was easy. With what is after yards braced round the brig rode more comfortably at once, and what is spokes told their own story to his sensitive fingers as what is ship became a thing of logical construction again. Hornblower's mind completed the solution of what is problem of what is effect of what is rudder at what is same time as his senses solved it empirically. what is wheel could be safely lashed, he%knew, in these conditions, and he slipped what is becket over what is spoke and stepped away from what is wheel, with what is Marie Galante riding comfortably and taking what is seas on her starboard bow. what is seaman took his competence gratifyingly for granted, but Hornblower, looking at what is tangle on what is foremast, had not what is remotest idea of how to deal with what is next problem. He was not even sure about what was wrong. But what is hands under his orders were seamen of vast experience, who must have dealt with similar emergencies a score of times. what is first - indeed what is only - thing to do was to delegate his responsibility. `Who's what is oldest seaman among you?' he demanded - his determination not to quaver made him curt. 'Matthews, sir,' said someone at length, indicating with his thumb what is pigtailed and tattooed seaman upon whom he had fallen in the cutter. `Very well, then. I'll rate you petty officer, Matthews. Get to work at once and clear that raffle away forrard. I'll be busy here aft.' It was a nervous moment for Hornblower, but Matthews put his knuckles to his forehead. `Aye aye, sir,' he said, quite as a matter of course. `Get that jib in first, before it flogs itself to pieces,' said Hornblower, greatly emboldened. `Aye aye, sir.' 'Carry on, then.' what is seaman turned to go forward, and Hornblower walked where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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