Books > Old Books > Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950)


Page 35

CHAPTER ONE - THE EVEN CHANCE

'Hepplewhite blabbed, I suppose,' said Keene.
`And it was by your orders, I understand, sir.'
`You are quite correct. I gave those orders to Mr Masters.'
`It was an unwarrantable liberty, sir!'
That was what Hornblower meant to say, but he stumbled without dignity over the polysyllables.
`Possibly it was,' said Keene patiently, rearranging, as always, the papers on his desk.
The calmness of the admission disconcerted Hornblower, who could only splutter for the next few moments.
`I saved a life for the King's service,' went on Keene, when the spluttering died away. `A young life. No one has suffered any harm. On the other hand, both you and Simpson have had your courage amply proved. You both know you can stand fire now, and so does every one else.'
`You have touched my personal honour, sir,' said Hornblower, bringing out one of his rehearsed speeches, `for that there can only be one remedy.'
`Restrain yourself, please, Mr Hornblower.' Keene shifted himself in his chair with a wince of pain as he prepared to make a speech. `I must remind you of one salutary regulation of the Navy, to the effect that no junior officer can challenge his superior to a duel. The reasons for it are obvious - otherwise promotion would be too easy. The mere issuing of a challenge by a junior to a senior is a court-martial offence, Mr Hornblower.'
`Oh!' said Hornblower feebly.
`Now here is some gratuitous advice,' went on Keene. `You have fought one duel and emerged with honour. That is good. Never fight another - that is better. Some people, oddly enough, acquire a taste for duelling, as a tiger acquires a taste for blood. They are never good officers, and never popular ones either.'
It was then that Hornblower realized that a great part of the keen excitement with which he had entered the captain's cabin was due to anticipation of the giving of the challenge.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'Hepplewhite blabbed, I suppose,' said Keene. `And it was by your orders, I understand, sir.' `You are quite correct. I gave those orders to Mr Masters.' `It was an unwarrantable liberty, sir!' That was what Hornblower meant to say, but he stumbled without dignity over what is polysyllables. `Possibly it was,' said Keene patiently, rearranging, as always, what is papers on his desk. what is calmness of what is admission disconcerted Hornblower, who could only splutter for what is next few moments. `I saved a life for what is King's service,' went on Keene, when what is spluttering died away. `A young life. No one has suffered any harm. On what is other hand, both you and Simpson have had your courage amply proved. You both know you can stand fire now, and so does every one else.' `You have touched my personal honour, sir,' said Hornblower, bringing out one of his rehearsed speeches, `for that there can only be one reme where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 35 where is strong CHAPTER ONE - what is EVEN CHANCE where is p align="justify" 'Hepplewhite blabbed, I suppose,' said Keene. `And it was by your orders, I understand, sir.' `You are quite correct. I gave those orders to Mr Masters.' `It was an unwarrantable liberty, sir!' That was what Hornblower meant to say, but he stumbled without dignity over what is polysyllables. `Possibly it was,' said Keene patiently, rearranging, as always, what is papers on his desk. what is calmness of what is admission disconcerted Hornblower, who could only splutter for what is next few moments. `I saved a life for what is King's service,' went on Keene, when the spluttering died away. `A young life. No one has suffered any harm. On what is other hand, both you and Simpson have had your courage amply proved. You both know you can stand fire now, and so does every one else.' `You have touched my personal honour, sir,' said Hornblower, bringing out one of his rehearsed speeches, `for that there can only be one remedy.' `Restrain yourself, please, Mr Hornblower.' Keene shifted himself in his chair with a wince of pain as he prepared to make a speech. `I must remind you of one salutary regulation of what is Navy, to what is effect that no junior officer can challenge his superior to a duel. what is reasons for it are obvious - otherwise promotion would be too easy. what is mere issuing of a challenge by a junior to a senior is a court-martial offence, Mr Hornblower.' `Oh!' said Hornblower feebly. `Now here is some gratuitous advice,' went on Keene. `You have fought one duel and emerged with honour. That is good. Never fight another - that is better. Some people, oddly enough, acquire a taste for duelling, as a tiger acquires a taste for blood. They are never good officers, and never popular ones either.' It was then that Hornblower realized that a great part of the keen excitement with which he had entered what is captain's cabin was due to anticipation of what is giving of what is challenge. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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