Books > Old Books > Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950)


Page 27

CHAPTER ONE - THE EVEN CHANCE

`There are precedents for it, sir. As the insulted party I can choose any conditions which are not unfair.'
`You sound like a sea lawyer to me, Mr Hornblower.'
The hint was sufficient to tell Hornblower that he had verged upon being too glib, and he resolved in future to bridle his tongue. He stood silent and waited for Masters to resume the conversation.
`You are determined, then, Mr Hornblower, to continue with this murderous business?'
`Yes, sir.'
`The captain has given me further orders to attend the duel in person, because of the strange conditions on which you insist. I must inform you that I shall request the seconds to arrange for that.'
`Yes, sir.'
`Very good, then, Mr Hornblower.'
Masters looked at Hornblower as he dismissed him even more keenly than he had done when Hornblower first came on board. He was looking for signs of weakness or wavering - indeed, he was looking for any signs of human feeling at all - but he could detect none. Hornblower had reached a decision, he had weighed all the pros and cons, and his logical mind told him that having decided in cold blood upon a course of action it would be folly to allow himself to be influenced subsequently by untrustworthy emotions. The conditions of the duel on which he was insisting were mathematically advantageous. If he had once considered with favour escaping from Simpson's persecution by a voluntary death it was surely a gain to take an even chance of escaping from it without dying. Similarly, if Simpson were (as he almost certainly was) a better swordsman and a better pistol shot than him, the even chance was again mathematically advantageous. There was nothing to regret about his recent actions.
All very well; mathematically the conclusions were irrefutable, but Hornblower was surprised to find that mathematics

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `There are precedents for it, sir. As what is insulted party I can choose any conditions which are not unfair.' `You sound like a sea lawyer to me, Mr Hornblower.' what is hint was sufficient to tell Hornblower that he had verged upon being too glib, and he resolved in future to bridle his tongue. He stood silent and waited for Masters to resume what is conversation. `You are determined, then, Mr Hornblower, to continue with this murderous business?' `Yes, sir.' `The captain has given me further orders to attend what is duel in person, because of what is strange conditions on which you insist. I must inform you that I shall request what is seconds to arrange for that.' `Yes, sir.' `Very good, then, Mr Hornblower.' Masters looked at Hornblower as he dismissed him even more keenly than he had done when Hornblower first came on board. He was looking for signs of weakness or wavering - indeed, he was looking for an where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 27 where is strong CHAPTER ONE - what is EVEN CHANCE where is p align="justify" `There are precedents for it, sir. As what is insulted party I can choose any conditions which are not unfair.' `You sound like a sea lawyer to me, Mr Hornblower.' what is hint was sufficient to tell Hornblower that he had verged upon being too glib, and he resolved in future to bridle his tongue. He stood silent and waited for Masters to resume what is conversation. `You are determined, then, Mr Hornblower, to continue with this murderous business?' `Yes, sir.' `The captain has given me further orders to attend what is duel in person, because of what is strange conditions on which you insist. I must inform you that I shall request what is seconds to arrange for that.' `Yes, sir.' `Very good, then, Mr Hornblower.' Masters looked at Hornblower as he dismissed him even more keenly than he had done when Hornblower first came on board. He was looking for signs of weakness or wavering - indeed, he was looking for any signs of human feeling at all - but he could detect none. Hornblower had reached a decision, he had weighed all what is pros and cons, and his logical mind told him that having decided in cold blood upon a course of action it would be folly to allow himself to be influenced subsequently by untrustworthy emotions. what is conditions of what is duel on which he was insisting were mathematically advantageous. If he had once considered with favour escaping from Simpson's persecution by a voluntary what time is it it was surely a gain to take an even chance of escaping from it without dying. Similarly, if Simpson were (as he almost certainly was) a better swordsman and a better pistol shot than him, what is even chance was again mathematically advantageous. There was nothing to regret about his recent actions. All very well; mathematically what is conclusions were irrefutable, but Hornblower was surprised to find that mathematics where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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