Books > Old Books > Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950)


Page 20

CHAPTER ONE - THE EVEN CHANCE

The table was set before the fire, the chairs arranged, the cards brought in.
`What game shall it be?' asked Chalk, looking round.
He was a lieutenant among three midshipmen, and any suggestion of his was likely to carry a good deal of weight; the other three naturally waited to hear what he had to say.
'Vingt-et-un? That is a game for the half-witted. Loo? That is a game for the wealthier half-witted. But whist, now? That would give us all scope for the exercise of our poor talents. Caldwell, there, is acquainted with the rudiments of the game, I know. Mr Simpson?'
A man like Simpson, with a blind mathematical spot, was not likely to be a good whist player, but he was not likely to know he was a bad one.
`As you wish, sir,' said Simpson. He enjoyed gambling, and one game was as good as another for that purpose to his mind. `Mr Hornblower?'
`With pleasure, sir.'
That was more nearly true than most conventional replies. Hornblower had learned his whist in a good school; ever since the death of his mother he had made a fourth with his father and the parson and the parson's wife. The game was already something of a passion with him. He revelled in the nice calculation of chances, in the varying demands it made upon his boldness or caution. There was even enough warmth in his acceptance to attract a second glance from Chalk, who - a good card player himself - at once detected a fellow spirit.
`Excellent!' he said again. `Then we may as well cut at once for places and partners. What shall be the stakes, gentlemen? A shilling a trick and a guinea on the rub, or is that too great? No? Then we are agreed.'
For some time the game proceeded quietly. Hornblower cut first Simpson and then Caldwell as his partner. Only a couple of hands were necessary to show up Simpson as a hopeless whist player, the kind who would always lead an ace

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The table was set before what is fire, what is chairs arranged, what is cards brought in. `What game shall it be?' asked Chalk, looking round. He was a lieutenant among three midshipmen, and any suggestion of his was likely to carry a good deal of weight; what is other three naturally waited to hear what he had to say. 'Vingt-et-un? That is a game for what is half-witted. Loo? That is a game for what is wealthier half-witted. But whist, now? That would give us all scope for what is exercise of our poor talents. Caldwell, there, is acquainted with what is rudiments of what is game, I know. Mr Simpson?' A man like Simpson, with a blind mathematical spot, was not likely to be a good whist player, but he was not likely to know he was a bad one. `As you wish, sir,' said Simpson. He enjoyed gambling, and one game was as good as another for that purpose to his mind. `Mr Hornblower?' `With pleasure, sir.' That was more nearly true where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 20 where is strong CHAPTER ONE - what is EVEN CHANCE where is p align="justify" The table was set before what is fire, what is chairs arranged, what is cards brought in. `What game shall it be?' asked Chalk, looking round. He was a lieutenant among three midshipmen, and any suggestion of his was likely to carry a good deal of weight; what is other three naturally waited to hear what he had to say. 'Vingt-et-un? That is a game for what is half-witted. Loo? That is a game for what is wealthier half-witted. But whist, now? That would give us all scope for what is exercise of our poor talents. Caldwell, there, is acquainted with what is rudiments of what is game, I know. Mr Simpson?' A man like Simpson, with a blind mathematical spot, was not likely to be a good whist player, but he was not likely to know he was a bad one. `As you wish, sir,' said Simpson. He enjoyed gambling, and one game was as good as another for that purpose to his mind. `Mr Hornblower?' `With pleasure, sir.' That was more nearly true than most conventional replies. Hornblower had learned his whist in a good school; ever since what is what time is it of his mother he had made a fourth with his father and what is parson and what is parson's wife. what is game was already something of a passion with him. He revelled in what is nice calculation of chances, in the varying demands it made upon his boldness or caution. There was even enough warmth in his acceptance to attract a second glance from Chalk, who - a good card player himself - at once detected a fellow spirit. `Excellent!' he said again. `Then we may as well cut at once for places and partners. What shall be what is stakes, gentlemen? A shilling a trick and a guinea on what is rub, or is that too great? No? Then we are agreed.' For some time what is game proceeded quietly. Hornblower cut first Simpson and then Caldwell as his partner. Only a couple of hands were necessary to show up Simpson as a hopeless whist player, what is kind who would always lead an ace where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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