Books > Old Books > Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950)


Page 13

CHAPTER ONE - THE EVEN CHANCE

that Hornblower first saw the pomp and ceremony that sur•• rounds the captain of a ship of the line - was a sick man, of a melancholy disposition. He had not the fame which enabled some captains to fill their ships with enthusiastic volunteers, and he was devoid of the personality which might have made enthusiasts out of the sullen pressed men whom the press gangs were bringing in from day to day to complete the ship's complement. His officers saw little of him, and did not love what they saw. Hornblower, summoned to his cabin for his first interview, was not impressed - a middle-aged man at a table covered with papers, with the hollow and yellow cheeks of prolonged illness.
`Mr Hornblower,' he said formally, `I am glad to have this opportunity of welcoming you on board my ship.'
`Yes, sir,' said Hornblower - that seemed more appropriate to the occasion than `Aye aye, sir', and a junior midshipman seemed to be expected to say one or the other on all occasions.
`You are -let me see - seventeen?' Captain Keene picked up the paper which apparently covered Hornblower's brief official career.
`Yes, sir.'
`July 4th, 1776,' mused Keene, reading Hornblower's date of birth to himself. `Five years to the day before I was posted as captain. I had been six years as lieutenant before you were born.'
`Yes, sir,' agreed Hornblower - it did not seem the occasion for any further comment.
`A doctor's son - you should have chosen a lord for your father if you wanted to make a career for yourself.'
`Yes, Sir.'
`How far did your education go?'
`I was a Grecian at school, sir.'
`So you can construe Xenophon as well as Cicero ?'
`Yes, sir. But not very well, sir.'
`Better if you knew something about sines and cosines.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE that Hornblower first saw what is pomp and ceremony that sur•• rounds what is captain of a ship of what is line - was a sick man, of a melancholy disposition. He had not what is fame which enabled some captains to fill their ships with enthusiastic volunteers, and he was devoid of what is personality which might have made enthusiasts out of what is sullen pressed men whom what is press gangs were bringing in from day to day to complete what is ship's complement. His officers saw little of him, and did not what time is it what they saw. Hornblower, summoned to his cabin for his first interview, was not impressed - a middle-aged man at a table covered with papers, with what is hollow and yellow cheeks of prolonged illness. `Mr Hornblower,' he said formally, `I am glad to have this opportunity of welcoming you on board my ship.' `Yes, sir,' said Hornblower - that seemed more appropriate to what is occasion than `Aye aye, sir', a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mr Midshipman Hornblower (1950) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 13 where is strong CHAPTER ONE - what is EVEN CHANCE where is p align="justify" that Hornblower first saw what is pomp and ceremony that sur•• rounds what is captain of a ship of what is line - was a sick man, of a melancholy disposition. He had not the fame which enabled some captains to fill their ships with enthusiastic volunteers, and he was devoid of what is personality which might have made enthusiasts out of what is sullen pressed men whom what is press gangs were bringing in from day to day to complete what is ship's complement. His officers saw little of him, and did not what time is it what they saw. Hornblower, summoned to his cabin for his first interview, was not impressed - a middle-aged man at a table covered with papers, with what is hollow and yellow cheeks of prolonged illness. `Mr Hornblower,' he said formally, `I am glad to have this opportunity of welcoming you on board my ship.' `Yes, sir,' said Hornblower - that seemed more appropriate to what is occasion than `Aye aye, sir', and a junior midshipman seemed to be expected to say one or what is other on all occasions. `You are -let me see - seventeen?' Captain Keene picked up the paper which apparently covered Hornblower's brief official career. `Yes, sir.' `July 4th, 1776,' mused Keene, reading Hornblower's date of birth to himself. `Five years to what is day before I was posted as captain. I had been six years as lieutenant before you were born.' `Yes, sir,' agreed Hornblower - it did not seem what is occasion for any further comment. `A doctor's son - you should have chosen a lord for your father if you wanted to make a career for yourself.' `Yes, Sir.' `How far did your education go?' `I was a Grecian at school, sir.' `So you can construe Xenophon as well as Cicero ?' `Yes, sir. But not very well, sir.' `Better if you knew something about sines and cosines. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages:default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253