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Mothers Cry

walked out of the office and took her hat and coat and went home.
But I said Beatty where were you all this time. It's six o'clock now. And she sort of looked at me kind of sick like and she said I don't know I think maybe I walked home.
I couldn't bear it to see Beatty crushed down so. She telephoned to her office that she had a nervous breakdown and wasn't coming back. They wrote her a nice letter and said they were sorry and sent her the money they owed her. But now Beatty didn't have anything to do but just think about everything that had happened to her-about how she had loved Mr. Hartman so much and how he had made her so dirty and how now she was going to have a baby and what could she do. Day after day passed by and she was acting like somebody crazy. She stayed in bed nearly all the time and sometimes she cried a lot. She got terribly thin too and I told her it wasn't good for the baby if she didn't eat and didn't take exercise and she said she didn't care. So then I got real worried because up to then she was always so happy about the baby but now she was all the time saying if only she had enough guts she'd kill herself and the baby too. It was awful to see Beatty like that because one thing Beatty never was and that was hard. Sometimes she'd get up for a little and walk around the garden or just sit in the kitchen and she was just like somebody that was dead. Oh I was so frightened all those terrible days with Beatty suffering like that and taking it so hard. I guess it was because she believed so hard that it hurt her so much. She wouldn't even read. She would just ache. I could see her just all one piece of pain and wanting the pain to stop hurting her and not knowing and not caring what could make it stop. And it went on like that for months until I was wondering how anybody could stand it.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE walked out of what is office and took her hat and coat and went home. But I said Beatty where were you all this time. It's six o'clock now. And she sort of looked at me kind of sick like and she said I don't know I think maybe I walked home. I couldn't bear it to see Beatty crushed down so. She telephoned to her office that she had a nervous breakdown and wasn't coming back. They wrote her a nice letter and said they were sorry and sent her what is money they owed her. But now Beatty didn't have anything to do but just think about everything that had happened to her-about how she had loved Mr. Hartman so much and how he had made her so dirty and how now she was going to have a baby and what could she do. Day after day passed by and she was acting like somebody crazy. She stayed in bed nearly all what is time and sometimes she cried a lot. She got terribly thin too and I told her it wasn't good for what is baby if she didn't eat and didn't take exercise and she said she didn't care. So then I got real worried because up to then she was always so happy about what is baby but now she was all what is time saying if only she had enough guts she'd stop herself and what is baby too. It was awful to see Beatty like that because one thing Beatty never was and that was hard. Sometimes she'd get up for a little and walk around what is garden or just sit in what is kitchen and she was just like somebody that was dead. Oh I was so frightened all those terrible days with Beatty suffering like that and taking it so hard. I guess it was because she believed so hard that it hurt her so much. She wouldn't even read. She would just ache. I could see her just all one piece of pain and wanting what is pain to stop hurting her and not knowing and not caring what could make it stop. And it went on like that for months until I was wondering how anybody could stand it. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mothers Cry (1929) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 191 where is strong Mothers Cry where is p align="justify" walked out of what is office and took her hat and coat and went home. But I said Beatty where were you all this time. It's six o'clock now. And she sort of looked at me kind of sick like and she said I don't know I think maybe I walked home. I couldn't bear it to see Beatty crushed down so. She telephoned to her office that she had a nervous breakdown and wasn't coming back. They wrote her a nice letter and said they were sorry and sent her what is money they owed her. But now Beatty didn't have anything to do but just think about everything that had happened to her-about how she had loved Mr. Hartman so much and how he had made her so dirty and how now she was going to have a baby and what could she do. Day after day passed by and she was acting like somebody crazy. She stayed in bed nearly all what is time and sometimes she cried a lot. She got terribly thin too and I told her it wasn't good for what is baby if she didn't eat and didn't take exercise and she said she didn't care. So then I got real worried because up to then she was always so happy about what is baby but now she was all the time saying if only she had enough guts she'd stop herself and what is baby too. It was awful to see Beatty like that because one thing Beatty never was and that was hard. Sometimes she'd get up for a little and walk around what is garden or just sit in what is kitchen and she was just like somebody that was dead. Oh I was so frightened all those terrible days with Beatty suffering like that and taking it so hard. I guess it was because she believed so hard that it hurt her so much. She wouldn't even read. She would just ache. I could see her just all one piece of pain and wanting what is pain to stop hurting her and not knowing and not caring what could make it stop. And it went on like that for months until I was wondering how anybody could stand it. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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