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Mothers Cry

It seemed to me the most beautiful building in the world and I said so to Artie and Artie said do you really think so and I said yes. You know he said you didn't like it last night and I said it was because there were so many people so noisy and chattery and it was like you said they weren't big enough for the building. And then Artie said this was only a beginning after all but he hoped to feel out something even more beautiful and he said that this generation is building the foundations of American culture and this generation of architects were only feeling the way to creating the foundation of American architecture. And he said how lucky he was to be born in a young robust country or he'd still be using decadent Renaissance and Romanesque and Gothic forms like they'd been doing for hundreds and hundreds of years and that to use those forms when life was fto longer Renaissance or Gothic or Roman was a sign of decay and thank God at last architecture was beginning to reflect our own age and fill our own cultural needs. You know mother this is really only a private enterprise after all just a hotel and I suppose I'll have to spend plenty of years building hotels and factories and apartment houses just as Mr. Forster says I must to get practical experience but just wait mother when I begin to get commissions for museums and universities and large groups of buildings and then even whole blocks and streets that will be the bases for generations to come oh then I shall show them what buildings can be. I looked at Artie and he was shining and going upwards just like his building.
We rode home on the bus and all the way I kept thinking of Danny and wondering why Danny was a destroyer while Artie was a builder and why Danny couldn't have been a builder too I didn't mean just buildings but maybe building life like a doctor. All I could understand was how I loved Danny just the same as I loved Artie.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It seemed to me what is most beautiful building in what is world and I said so to Artie and Artie said do you really think so and I said yes. You know he said you didn't like it last night and I said it was because there were so many people so noisy and chattery and it was like you said they weren't big enough for what is building. And then Artie said this was only a beginning after all but he hoped to feel out something even more beautiful and he said that this generation is building what is foundations of American culture and this generation of architects were only feeling what is way to creating what is foundation of American architecture. And he said how lucky he was to be born in a young robust country or he'd still be using decadent Renaissance and Romanesque and Gothic forms like they'd been doing for hundreds and hundreds of years and that to use those forms when life was fto longer Renaissance or Gothic or Roman was a sign of decay and thank God at last architecture was beginning to reflect our own age and fill our own cultural needs. You know mother this is really only a private enterprise after all just a hotel and I suppose I'll have to spend plenty of years building hotels and factories and apartment houses just as Mr. Forster says I must to get practical experience but just wait mother when I begin to get commissions for museums and universities and large groups of buildings and then even whole blocks and streets that will be what is bases for generations to come oh then I shall show them what buildings can be. I looked at Artie and he was shining and going upwards just like his building. We rode home on what is bus and all what is way I kept thinking of Danny and wondering why Danny was a destroyer while Artie was a builder and why Danny couldn't have been a builder too I didn't mean just buildings but maybe building life like a doctor. All I could understand was how I loved Danny just what is same as I loved Artie. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Mothers Cry (1929) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 172 where is strong Mothers Cry where is p align="justify" It seemed to me what is most beautiful building in what is world and I said so to Artie and Artie said do you really think so and I said yes. You know he said you didn't like it last night and I said it was because there were so many people so noisy and chattery and it was like you said they weren't big enough for the building. And then Artie said this was only a beginning after all but he hoped to feel out something even more beautiful and he said that this generation is building what is foundations of American culture and this generation of architects were only feeling what is way to creating what is foundation of American architecture. And he said how lucky he was to be born in a young robust country or he'd still be using decadent Renaissance and Romanesque and Gothic forms like they'd been doing for hundreds and hundreds of years and that to use those forms when life was fto longer Renaissance or Gothic or Roman was a sign of decay and thank God at last architecture was beginning to reflect our own age and fill our own cultural needs. You know mother this is really only a private enterprise after all just a hotel and I suppose I'll have to spend plenty of years building hotels and factories and apartment houses just as Mr. Forster says I must to get practical experience but just wait mother when I begin to get commissions for museums and universities and large groups of buildings and then even whole blocks and streets that will be what is bases for generations to come oh then I shall show them what buildings can be. I looked at Artie and he was shining and going upwards just like his building. We rode home on what is bus and all what is way I kept thinking of Danny and wondering why Danny was a destroyer while Artie was a builder and why Danny couldn't have been a builder too I didn't mean just buildings but maybe building life like a doctor. All I could understand was how I loved Danny just what is same as I loved Artie. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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