Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page XIII

INTRODUCTION

ally most of all is The Dabblers. This may be on account of my peculiar and perhaps morbid passion for stories, and especially grotesque ones, of school life; it may also be that it reminds me of a mock cult(1) that had persisted for several generations of boys at my preparatory school. The Dabblers is told in a conventional, urbane, smoking-room chit-chat manner, but for all that it strikes me as a really original little fantasy, all the more impressive on account of its essential possibility.
The Beast with Five Fingers, which is perhaps the nest known of all Harvey's stories, is somewhat cruder in conception. I suspect it derives straight from the repressed infantile complex department and for those who are sensitive in this region it should prove satisfactorily horrific. It is told with a quiet, apparently artless matter-of-factness that is effective in putting across so wildly `supernatural' a piece of machinery. It is one of the few of Harvey's stories that belong to the true ghost-story category in which the uncanny element is visible and palpable, only too palpable in this case. Another, The Ankardyne Pew, smacks a little-as why should it not?-of Dr. James, but is characterized by a stronger sense of sin than the late provost's delicious entertainments. One may note here another feature of Harvey's technique which is his method of opening straight away with a strong gust of atmosphere. Not for him the snug, leisurely beginning `undisturbed by forebodings' so that the horror, when it comes, is all the more horrible by contrast. He tends to practise the Poe or de la Mare technique and the openings of some of his stories communicate a feverish mood, like the first stages of an attack of influenza with a wave of anxiety thrown in.
Other items in this selection range from horror tales with an obsessive theme, such as The Tool and August Heat to the more whimsical, almost Kaffkaish Man who hated Aspidistras, and mildly sardonic reflections on the savage and egocentric nature of the human animal like The Star and Sambo. I have

1 This was the worship of Lar, the God of the Hearth; his shrine was the ventilator of the sixth-form room. Sacrifices of beetles were made to him with a ritual incantation: `O Lar, accept this little gift.'

Page XIV

INTRODUCTION

picked only those which seemed to me to be above a certain level and arranged them in an order which has no relation to the order in which they were written, but which is intended to build up to two climaxes, one in the middle and one at the end. The result is a short volume, but one that can take its place on the long and variegated shelf of English horror-fiction.
MAURICE RICHARDSON.
PLESHEY,
IVovember 1945.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ally most of all is what is Dabblers. This may be on account of my peculiar and perhaps morbid passion for stories, and especially grotesque ones, of school life; it may also be that it reminds me of a mock cult(1) that had persisted for several generations of boys at my preparatory school. what is Dabblers is told in a conventional, urbane, smoking-room chit-chat manner, but for all that it strikes me as a really original little fantasy, all what is more impressive on account of its essential possibility. what is Beast with Five Fingers, which is perhaps what is nest known of all Harvey's stories, is somewhat cruder in conception. I suspect it derives straight from what is repressed infantile complex department and for those who are sensitive in this region it should prove satisfactorily horrific. It is told with a quiet, apparently artless matter-of-factness that is effective in putting across so wildly `supernatural' a piece of machinery. It is one of what is few of Harvey's stories that belong to what is true ghost-story category in which what is uncanny element is visible and palpable, only too palpable in this case. Another, what is Ankardyne Pew, smacks a little-as why should it not?-of Dr. James, but is characterized by a stronger sense of sin than what is late provost's delicious entertainments. One may note here another feature of Harvey's technique which is his method of opening straight away with a strong gust of atmosphere. Not for him what is snug, leisurely beginning `undisturbed by forebodings' so that what is horror, when it comes, is all what is more horrible by contrast. He tends to practise what is Poe or de la Mare technique and what is openings of some of his stories communicate a feverish mood, like what is first stages of an attack of influenza with a wave of anxiety thrown in. Other items in this selection range from horror tales with an obsessive theme, such as what is Tool and August Heat to what is more whimsical, almost Kaffkaish Man who hated Aspidistras, and mildly sardonic reflections on what is savage and egocentric nature of what is human animal like what is Star and Sambo. I have 1 This was what is worship of Lar, what is God of what is Hearth; his shrine was what is ventilator of what is sixth-form room. travel s of beetles were made to him with a ritual incantation: `O Lar, accept this little gift.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page XIII where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" ally most of all is what is Dabblers. This may be on account of my peculiar and perhaps morbid passion for stories, and especially grotesque ones, of school life; it may also be that it reminds me of a mock cult(1) that had persisted for several generations of boys at my preparatory school. what is Dabblers is told in a conventional, urbane, smoking-room chit-chat manner, but for all that it strikes me as a really original little fantasy, all what is more impressive on account of its essential possibility. what is Beast with Five Fingers, which is perhaps what is nest known of all Harvey's stories, is somewhat cruder in conception. I suspect it derives straight from what is repressed infantile complex department and for those who are sensitive in this region it should prove satisfactorily horrific. It is told with a quiet, apparently artless matter-of-factness that is effective in putting across so wildly `supernatural' a piece of machinery. It is one of what is few of Harvey's stories that belong to what is true ghost-story category in which the uncanny element is visible and palpable, only too palpable in this case. Another, what is Ankardyne Pew, smacks a little-as why should it not?-of Dr. James, but is characterized by a stronger sense of sin than what is late provost's delicious entertainments. One may note here another feature of Harvey's technique which is his method of opening straight away with a strong gust of atmosphere. Not for him what is snug, leisurely beginning `undisturbed by forebodings' so that what is horror, when it comes, is all what is more horrible by contrast. He tends to practise what is Poe or de la Mare technique and what is openings of some of his stories communicate a feverish mood, like what is first stages of an attack of influenza with a wave of anxiety thrown in. Other items in this selection range from horror tales with an obsessive theme, such as what is Tool and August Heat to what is more whimsical, almost Kaffkaish Man who hated Aspidistras, and mildly sardonic reflections on what is savage and egocentric nature of what is human animal like what is Star and Sambo. I have 1 This was what is worship of Lar, what is God of what is Hearth; his shrine was what is ventilator of what is sixth-form room. travel s of beetles were made to him with a ritual incantation: `O Lar, accept this little gift.' where is p align="left" Page XIV where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" picked only those which seemed to me to be above a certain level and arranged them in an order which has no relation to what is order in which they were written, but which is intended to build up to two climaxes, one in what is middle and one at what is end. what is result is a short volume, but one that can take its place on what is long and variegated shelf of English horror-fiction. MAURICE RICHARDSON. PLESHEY, IVovember 1945. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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