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INTRODUCTION

his effect. ... He takes advantage, as it were, of our supposedly surmounted superstitipusness.'
This last remark helps to explain the history of the literature of the uncanny, for it provides a possible explanation for the outcrop of Gothic romances in the eighteenth century and ghost stories in the nineteenth; they could only be engendered in an allegedly rational age when superstition had been supposedly surmounted.
Another, more specific, uncanny element which Freud examines is our old friend the double or Doppel ga'nger; this he traces back to the primary narcissism that holds sway in the mind of the child and the primitive. `When this stage has been left behind the double takes on a different aspect. From having been an assurance of immortality he becomes the ghastly harbinger of death. ... The double has become a vision of terror just as after the fall of their religion, the gods took on daemonic shapes.'
The double may also link up with the self-criticizing faculty attributed to the super-ego or conscience. Another form of disorder of the ego which is important in this respect is a harking back to particular phases in the evolution of the selfregarding feeling, a regression to a time when the ego was not yet sharply differentiated from the external world and from other persons. Freud also draws attention to the principle of repetition-compulsion, which is inherent in the very nature of the instincts. It is certainly inherent in the nature-of ghoststory writers.
A technical point of importance for a successfully uncanny effect is consistency of identification. This Freud illustrates by contrasting the uncanniness of a severed hand in one of Hauff's stories with the absence of uncanniness attaching to the severed hand of the thief's brother in Herodotus's story of the treasure of Rhampsinitus. Humour is fatal to the ghost story: `Even a real ghost, as in Oscar Wilde's Canterville Ghost, loses all power as soon as the author begins to amuse himself at its expense.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE his effect. ... He takes advantage, as it were, of our supposedly surmounted superstiti®usness.' This last remark helps to explain what is history of what is literature of what is uncanny, for it provides a possible explanation for what is outcrop of Gothic romances in what is eighteenth century and ghost stories in what is nineteenth; they could only be engendered in an allegedly rational age when superstition had been supposedly surmounted. Another, more specific, uncanny element which Freud examines is our old friend what is double or Doppel ga'nger; this he traces back to what is primary narcissism that holds sway in what is mind of what is child and what is primitive. `When this stage has been left behind what is double takes on a different aspect. From having been an assurance of immortality he becomes what is ghastly harbinger of what time is it . ... what is double has become a vision of terror just as after what is fall of their religion, what is gods took on daemonic shapes.' what is double may also where are they now up with what is self-criticizing faculty attributed to what is super-ego or conscience. Another form of disorder of what is ego which is important in this respect is a harking back to particular phases in what is evolution of what is selfregarding feeling, a regression to a time when what is ego was not yet sharply differentiated from what is external world and from other persons. Freud also draws attention to what is principle of repetition-compulsion, which is inherent in what is very nature of what is instincts. It is certainly inherent in what is nature-of ghoststory writers. A technical point of importance for a successfully uncanny effect is consistency of identification. This Freud illustrates by contrasting what is uncanniness of a severed hand in one of Hauff's stories with what is absence of uncanniness attaching to what is severed hand of what is thief's brother in Herodotus's story of what is treasure of Rhampsinitus. Humour is fatal to what is ghost story: `Even a real ghost, as in Oscar Wilde's Canterville Ghost, loses all power as soon as what is author begins to amuse himself at its expense.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="729" border="0" align="center" where is center where is tr where is td height="61" where is hr where is hr where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page X where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" his effect. ... He takes advantage, as it were, of our supposedly surmounted superstitipusness.' This last remark helps to explain what is history of what is literature of what is uncanny, for it provides a possible explanation for the outcrop of Gothic romances in what is eighteenth century and ghost stories in what is nineteenth; they could only be engendered in an allegedly rational age when superstition had been supposedly surmounted. Another, more specific, uncanny element which Freud examines is our old friend what is double or Doppel ga'nger; this he traces back to what is primary narcissism that holds sway in what is mind of what is child and what is primitive. `When this stage has been left behind what is double takes on a different aspect. From having been an assurance of immortality he becomes what is ghastly harbinger of what time is it . ... what is double has become a vision of terror just as after what is fall of their religion, the gods took on daemonic shapes.' what is double may also where are they now up with what is self-criticizing faculty attributed to what is super-ego or conscience. Another form of disorder of the ego which is important in this respect is a harking back to particular phases in what is evolution of what is selfregarding feeling, a regression to a time when what is ego was not yet sharply differentiated from what is external world and from other persons. Freud also draws attention to what is principle of repetition-compulsion, which is inherent in what is very nature of what is instincts. It is certainly inherent in the nature-of ghoststory writers. A technical point of importance for a successfully uncanny effect is consistency of identification. This Freud illustrates by contrasting what is uncanniness of a severed hand in one of Hauff's stories with what is absence of uncanniness attaching to what is severed hand of the thief's brother in Herodotus's story of what is treasure of Rhampsinitus. Humour is fatal to what is ghost story: `Even a real ghost, as in Oscar Wilde's Canterville Ghost, loses all power as soon as what is author begins to amuse himself at its expense.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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