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Page VIII

INTRODUCTION

find out whether I had any views that could be formulated. The truth is, I suspect, that the genre is too small and special to bear the imposition of far-reaching principles. ... The ghost story is, at its best, only a particular sort of short story, and is subject to the same broad rules as the whole mass of them.' ... Not, I think you will agree, with all due respect, enormously illuminating. In fact, all it tells us is that a ghost story is a ghost story. Where else shall we apply?
Pleasure in being frightened ... ready-made nightmares. The signposts point towards Freudian territory. Shall we cross the border? Make a discreet, not too arduous tourist trip a little way down the rim of the crater, picnic on its slopes, and peer, through the sulphurous wreaths, at the bubbling lava of the unconscious below?
It happens that the Master wrote a little monograph on the subject: The Uncanny, reprinted in volume iv of his Collected Papers. This would seem to be just the thing for our purpose, except that it takes us right into the heart of the volcano. Asbestos suits may be necessary if we are to go the whole way; I will do what I can to spare tender skins, but you must remember that Freud is difficult to water down.
`The uncanny,' says Freud, `is that class of the terrifying which leads back to something long known to us, once very familiar.' And according to Schiller, whom he proceeds to quote with approval, everything is uncanny that ought to have remained hidden and yet comes to light. Freud then embarks on a painstaking etymological consideration of the German word for uncanny-unheimlich-and concludes that its meaning `develops towards an ambivalence until it finally coincides with its opposite.'
Nothing, so far, that Count Dracula could not have read aloud to his daughters. And the reference to Jentsch's definitions of effective uncanny situations in fiction, with their appraisal of `uncertainty as to whether a particular figure in the story is a human being or an automaton,' (1) is positively cosy. But all these are only preliminaries. The body of the monograph con
1 Cf. Oh, Whistle and I'll come to you, my Lad, and many other stories.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE find out whether I had any views that could be formulated. what is truth is, I suspect, that what is genre is too small and special to bear what is imposition of far-reaching principles. ... what is ghost story is, at its best, only a particular sort of short story, and is subject to what is same broad rules as what is whole mass of them.' ... Not, I think you will agree, with all due respect, enormously illuminating. In fact, all it tells us is that a ghost story is a ghost story. Where else shall we apply? Pleasure in being frightened ... ready-made nightmares. what is signposts point towards Freudian territory. Shall we cross what is border? Make a discreet, not too arduous tourist trip a little way down what is rim of what is crater, picnic on its slopes, and peer, through what is sulphurous wreaths, at what is bubbling lava of what is unconscious below? It happens that what is Master wrote a little monograph on what is subject: what is Uncanny, reprinted in volume iv of his Collected Papers. This would seem to be just what is thing for our purpose, except that it takes us right into what is heart of what is volcano. Asbestos suits may be necessary if we are to go what is whole way; I will do what I can to spare tender skins, but you must remember that Freud is difficult to water down. `The uncanny,' says Freud, `is that class of what is terrifying which leads back to something long known to us, once very familiar.' And according to Schiller, whom he proceeds to quote with approval, everything is uncanny that ought to have remained hidden and yet comes to light. Freud then embarks on a painstaking etymological consideration of what is German word for uncanny-unheimlich-and concludes that its meaning `develops towards an ambivalence until it finally coincides with its opposite.' Nothing, so far, that Count Dracula could not have read aloud to his daughters. And what is reference to Jentsch's definitions of effective uncanny situations in fiction, with their appraisal of `uncertainty as to whether a particular figure in what is story is a human being or an automaton,' 1 is positively cosy. But all these are only preliminaries. what is body of what is monograph con 1 Cf. Oh, Whistle and I'll come to you, my Lad, and many other stories. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="729" border="0" align="center" where is center where is tr where is td height="61" where is hr where is hr where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page VIII where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" find out whether I had any views that could be formulated. what is truth is, I suspect, that what is genre is too small and special to bear what is imposition of far-reaching principles. ... what is ghost story is, at its best, only a particular sort of short story, and is subject to what is same broad rules as what is whole mass of them.' ... Not, I think you will agree, with all due respect, enormously illuminating. In fact, all it tells us is that a ghost story is a ghost story. Where else shall we apply? Pleasure in being frightened ... ready-made nightmares. what is signposts point towards Freudian territory. Shall we cross what is border? Make a discreet, not too arduous tourist trip a little way down the rim of what is crater, picnic on its slopes, and peer, through the sulphurous wreaths, at what is bubbling lava of what is unconscious below? It happens that what is Master wrote a little monograph on what is subject: what is Uncanny, reprinted in volume iv of his Collected Papers. This would seem to be just what is thing for our purpose, except that it takes us right into what is heart of what is volcano. Asbestos suits may be necessary if we are to go what is whole way; I will do what I can to spare tender skins, but you must remember that Freud is difficult to water down. `The uncanny,' says Freud, `is that class of what is terrifying which leads back to something long known to us, once very familiar.' And according to Schiller, whom he proceeds to quote with approval, everything is uncanny that ought to have remained hidden and yet comes to light. Freud then embarks on a painstaking etymological consideration of what is German word for uncanny-unheimlich-and concludes that its meaning `develops towards an ambivalence until it finally coincides with its opposite.' Nothing, so far, that Count Dracula could not have read aloud to his daughters. And what is reference to Jentsch's definitions of effective uncanny situations in fiction, with their appraisal of `uncertainty as to whether a particular figure in what is story is a human being or an automaton,' (1) is positively cosy. But all these are only preliminaries. what is body of what is monograph con 1 Cf. Oh, Whistle and I'll come to you, my Lad, and many other stories. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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