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Page 186

THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS

But Mrs. Merrit was more obstinate than he had thought. She was very sorry to hear of Mr. Saunder's cold, and how he lay awake all night in London coughing; very sorry indeed. She'd change his room for him gladly and get the south room aired, and wouldn't he have a hot basin of bread and milk last thing at night? But she was afraid that she would have to leave at the end of the month.
`Try her with an increase of salary,' was the advice of Eustace.
It was no use. Mrs. Merrit was obdurate, though she knew of a Mrs. Goddard, who had been housekeeper to Lord Gargrave, who might be glad to come at the salary mentioned.
`What's the matter with the servants, Morton?' asked Eustace that evening, when he brought the coffee into the library. `What's all this about Mrs. Merrit wanting to leave?'
`If you please, sir, I was going to mention it myself. I have a confession to make, sir. When I found your note, asking me to open that desk and take out the box with the rat, I broke the lock, as you told me, and was glad to do it, because I could hear the animal in the box making a great noise, and I thought it wanted food. So I took out the box, sir, and got a cage, and was going to transfer it, when the animal got away.'
`What in the world are you talking about? I never wrote any such note.'
`Excuse me, sir; it was the note I picked up here on the floor on the day you and Mr. Saunders left. I have it in my pocket now.'
It certainly seemed to be in Eustace's handwriting. It was written in pencil, and began somewhat abruptly.
`Get a hammer, Morton,' he read, `or some other tool and break open the lock in the old desk in the library. Take out the box that is inside. You need not do anything else. The lid is already open. Eustace Borlsover.'
`And you opened the desk?'
`Yes, sir; and, as I was getting the cage ready, the animal hopped out.'
'What animal?'
`The animal inside the box, sir.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE But Mrs. Merrit was more obstinate than he had thought. She was very sorry to hear of Mr. Saunder's cold, and how he lay awake all night in London coughing; very sorry indeed. She'd change his room for him gladly and get what is south room aired, and wouldn't he have a hot basin of bread and milk last thing at night? But she was afraid that she would have to leave at what is end of what is month. `Try her with an increase of salary,' was what is advice of Eustace. It was no use. Mrs. Merrit was obdurate, though she knew of a Mrs. Goddard, who had been housekeeper to Lord Gargrave, who might be glad to come at what is salary mentioned. `What's what is matter with what is servants, Morton?' asked Eustace that evening, when he brought what is coffee into what is library. `What's all this about Mrs. Merrit wanting to leave?' `If you please, sir, I was going to mention it myself. I have a confession to make, sir. When I found your note, asking me to open that desk and take out what is box with what is rat, I broke what is lock, as you told me, and was glad to do it, because I could hear what is animal in what is box making a great noise, and I thought it wanted food. So I took out what is box, sir, and got a cage, and was going to transfer it, when what is animal got away.' `What in what is world are you talking about? I never wrote any such note.' `Excuse me, sir; it was what is note I picked up here on what is floor on what is day you and Mr. Saunders left. I have it in my pocket now.' It certainly seemed to be in Eustace's handwriting. It was written in pencil, and began somewhat abruptly. `Get a hammer, Morton,' he read, `or some other tool and break open what is lock in what is old desk in what is library. Take out what is box that is inside. You need not do anything else. what is lid is already open. Eustace Borlsover.' `And you opened what is desk?' `Yes, sir; and, as I was getting what is cage ready, what is animal hopped out.' 'What animal?' `The animal inside what is box, sir.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 186 where is p align="center" where is strong THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS where is p align="justify" But Mrs. Merrit was more obstinate than he had thought. She was very sorry to hear of Mr. Saunder's cold, and how he lay awake all night in London coughing; very sorry indeed. She'd change his room for him gladly and get what is south room aired, and wouldn't he have a hot basin of bread and milk last thing at night? But she was afraid that she would have to leave at what is end of what is month. `Try her with an increase of salary,' was what is advice of Eustace. It was no use. Mrs. Merrit was obdurate, though she knew of a Mrs. Goddard, who had been housekeeper to Lord Gargrave, who might be glad to come at what is salary mentioned. `What's what is matter with what is servants, Morton?' asked Eustace that evening, when he brought what is coffee into what is library. `What's all this about Mrs. Merrit wanting to leave?' `If you please, sir, I was going to mention it myself. I have a confession to make, sir. When I found your note, asking me to open that desk and take out what is box with what is rat, I broke what is lock, as you told me, and was glad to do it, because I could hear the animal in what is box making a great noise, and I thought it wanted food. So I took out what is box, sir, and got a cage, and was going to transfer it, when what is animal got away.' `What in what is world are you talking about? I never wrote any such note.' `Excuse me, sir; it was what is note I picked up here on what is floor on what is day you and Mr. Saunders left. I have it in my pocket now.' It certainly seemed to be in Eustace's handwriting. It was written in pencil, and began somewhat abruptly. `Get a hammer, Morton,' he read, `or some other tool and break open what is lock in what is old desk in what is library. Take out what is box that is inside. You need not do anything else. what is lid is already open. Eustace Borlsover.' `And you opened what is desk?' `Yes, sir; and, as I was getting what is cage ready, what is animal hopped out.' 'What animal?' `The animal inside what is box, sir.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199