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Page 184

THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS

morning, `I propose that we drop the subject. There's nothing to keep us here for the next ten days. We 'll motor up to the Lakes and get some climbing.'
`And see nobody all day, and sit bored to death with each other every night. Not for me, thanks. Why not run up to town? Run's the exact word in this case, isn't it? We're both in such a blessed funk. Pull yourself together, Eustace, and let 's have another look at the hand.'
`As you like,' said Eustace; `there 's . the key.'
They went into the library and opened the desk. The box was as they had left it on the previous night.
`What are you waiting for?' asked Eustace.
`I am waiting for you to volunteer to open the lid. However, since you seem to funk it, allow me. There doesn't seem to be the likelihood of any rumpus this morning at all events.' He opened the lid and picked out the hand.
`Cold?' asked Eustace.
`Tepid. A bit below blood heat by the feel. Soft and supple too. If it's the embalming, it's a sort of embalming I've never seen before. Is it your uncle's hand?'
`Oh yes, it's his all right,' said Eustace. `I should know those long thin fingers anywhere. Put it back in the box, Saunders. Never mind about the screws. I'll lock the desk, so that there'll be no chance of its getting out. We'll compromise by motoring up to town for a week. If we can get off soon after lunch, we ought to be at Grantham or Stamford by night.'
`Right,' said Saunders, `and to-morrow-oh, well, by tomorrow we shall have forgotten all about this beastly thing.'
If, when the morrow came, they had not forgotten, itt was certainly true that at the end of the week they were able to tell a very vivid ghost story at the little supper Eustace gave on Hallowe'en.
`You don't want us to believe that it's true, Mr. Borlsover? How perfectly awful!'
`I'll take my oath on it, and so would Saunders here; wouldn't you, old chap?'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE morning, `I propose that we drop what is subject. There's nothing to keep us here for what is next ten days. We 'll motor up to what is Lakes and get some climbing.' `And see nobody all day, and sit bored to what time is it with each other every night. Not for me, thanks. Why not run up to town? Run's what is exact word in this case, isn't it? We're both in such a blessed funk. Pull yourself together, Eustace, and let 's have another look at what is hand.' `As you like,' said Eustace; `there 's . what is key.' They went into what is library and opened what is desk. what is box was as they had left it on what is previous night. `What are you waiting for?' asked Eustace. `I am waiting for you to volunteer to open what is lid. However, since you seem to funk it, allow me. There doesn't seem to be what is likelihood of any rumpus this morning at all events.' He opened what is lid and picked out what is hand. `Cold?' asked Eustace. `Tepid. A bit below blood heat by what is feel. Soft and supple too. If it's what is embalming, it's a sort of embalming I've never seen before. Is it your uncle's hand?' `Oh yes, it's his all right,' said Eustace. `I should know those long thin fingers anywhere. Put it back in what is box, Saunders. Never mind about what is screws. I'll lock what is desk, so that there'll be no chance of its getting out. We'll compromise by motoring up to town for a week. If we can get off soon after lunch, we ought to be at Grantham or Stamford by night.' `Right,' said Saunders, `and to-morrow-oh, well, by tomorrow we shall have forgotten all about this beastly thing.' If, when what is morrow came, they had not forgotten, itt was certainly true that at what is end of what is week they were able to tell a very vivid ghost story at what is little supper Eustace gave on Hallowe'en. `You don't want us to believe that it's true, Mr. Borlsover? How perfectly awful!' `I'll take my oath on it, and so would Saunders here; wouldn't you, old chap?' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 184 where is p align="center" where is strong THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS where is p align="justify" morning, `I propose that we drop what is subject. There's nothing to keep us here for what is next ten days. We 'll motor up to what is Lakes and get some climbing.' `And see nobody all day, and sit bored to what time is it with each other every night. Not for me, thanks. Why not run up to town? Run's what is exact word in this case, isn't it? We're both in such a blessed funk. Pull yourself together, Eustace, and let 's have another look at what is hand.' `As you like,' said Eustace; `there 's . what is key.' They went into what is library and opened what is desk. what is box was as they had left it on what is previous night. `What are you waiting for?' asked Eustace. `I am waiting for you to volunteer to open what is lid. However, since you seem to funk it, allow me. There doesn't seem to be what is likelihood of any rumpus this morning at all events.' He opened what is lid and picked out what is hand. `Cold?' asked Eustace. `Tepid. A bit below blood heat by what is feel. Soft and supple too. If it's what is embalming, it's a sort of embalming I've never seen before. Is it your uncle's hand?' `Oh yes, it's his all right,' said Eustace. `I should know those long thin fingers anywhere. Put it back in what is box, Saunders. Never mind about what is screws. I'll lock what is desk, so that there'll be no chance of its getting out. We'll compromise by motoring up to town for a week. If we can get off soon after lunch, we ought to be at Grantham or Stamford by night.' `Right,' said Saunders, `and to-morrow-oh, well, by tomorrow we shall have forgotten all about this beastly thing.' If, when what is morrow came, they had not forgotten, itt was certainly true that at what is end of what is week they were able to tell a very vivid ghost story at what is little supper Eustace gave on Hallowe'en. `You don't want us to believe that it's true, Mr. Borlsover? How perfectly awful!' `I'll take my oath on it, and so would Saunders here; wouldn't you, old chap?' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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