Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 182

THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS

`Thanks,' said Eustace, as he emptied the glass. `Don't go to bed yet, Morton. There are a lot of books that have fallen down by accident. Bring them up and put them back in their shelves.'
Morton had never seen Borlsover in so talkative a mood as on that night. `Here,' said Eustace, when the books had been put back and dusted, `you might hold up these boards for me, Morton. That beast in the box got out, and I've been chasing it all over the place.'
`I think I can hear it clawing at the books, sir. They're not valuable, I hope? I think that 's the carriage, sir; I'll go and call Mr. Saunders.'
It seemed to Eustace that he was away for five minutes, but it could hardly have been more than one, when he returned with Saunders. `All right, Morton, you can go now. I'm up here, Saunders.'
`What's all the row?' asked Saunders, as he lounged forward with his hands in his pockets. The luck had been with him all the evening. He was completely satisfied, both with himself and with Captain Lockwood's taste in' wines. `What 's the matter? You look to me to be in an absolutely blue funk.'
`That old devil of an uncle of mine,' began Eustace-` Oh, I can't explain it all. It's his hand that's been playing Old Harry all the evening. But I've got it cornered behind these books. You 've got to help me to catch it.'
'What's up with you, Eustace ? What's the game?'
`It's no game, you silly idiot! If you don't believe me, take out one of those books and put your hand in and feel.'
`All right,' said Saunders; `but wait till I've rolled up my sleeve. The accumulated dust of centuries, eh?' He took off his coat, knelt down, and thrust his arm along the shelf.
`There's something there right enough,' he said. `It's got a funny, stumpy end to it, whatever it is, and nips like a crab. Ah! no, you don't!' He pulled his hand out in a flash. `Shove in a book quickly. Now it can't get out.'
`What was it?' asked Eustace.
'Something that wanted very much to get hold of me. I felt

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Thanks,' said Eustace, as he emptied what is glass. `Don't go to bed yet, Morton. There are a lot of books that have fallen down by accident. Bring them up and put them back in their shelves.' Morton had never seen Borlsover in so talkative a mood as on that night. `Here,' said Eustace, when what is books had been put back and dusted, `you might hold up these boards for me, Morton. That beast in what is box got out, and I've been chasing it all over what is place.' `I think I can hear it clawing at what is books, sir. They're not valuable, I hope? I think that 's what is carriage, sir; I'll go and call Mr. Saunders.' It seemed to Eustace that he was away for five minutes, but it could hardly have been more than one, when he returned with Saunders. `All right, Morton, you can go now. I'm up here, Saunders.' `What's all what is row?' asked Saunders, as he lounged forward with his hands in his pockets. what is luck had been with him all what is evening. He was completely satisfied, both with himself and with Captain Lockwood's taste in' wines. `What 's what is matter? You look to me to be in an absolutely blue funk.' `That old fun of an uncle of mine,' began Eustace-` Oh, I can't explain it all. It's his hand that's been playing Old Harry all what is evening. But I've got it cornered behind these books. You 've got to help me to catch it.' 'What's up with you, Eustace ? What's what is game?' `It's no game, you silly idiot! If you don't believe me, take out one of those books and put your hand in and feel.' `All right,' said Saunders; `but wait till I've rolled up my sleeve. what is accumulated dust of centuries, eh?' He took off his coat, knelt down, and thrust his arm along what is shelf. `There's something there right enough,' he said. `It's got a funny, stumpy end to it, whatever it is, and nips like a crab. Ah! no, you don't!' He pulled his hand out in a flash. `Shove in a book quickly. Now it can't get out.' `What was it?' asked Eustace. 'Something that wanted very much to get hold of me. I felt where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 182 where is p align="center" where is strong THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS where is p align="justify" `Thanks,' said Eustace, as he emptied what is glass. `Don't go to bed yet, Morton. There are a lot of books that have fallen down by accident. Bring them up and put them back in their shelves.' Morton had never seen Borlsover in so talkative a mood as on that night. `Here,' said Eustace, when what is books had been put back and dusted, `you might hold up these boards for me, Morton. That beast in what is box got out, and I've been chasing it all over what is place.' `I think I can hear it clawing at what is books, sir. They're not valuable, I hope? I think that 's what is carriage, sir; I'll go and call Mr. Saunders.' It seemed to Eustace that he was away for five minutes, but it could hardly have been more than one, when he returned with Saunders. `All right, Morton, you can go now. I'm up here, Saunders.' `What's all what is row?' asked Saunders, as he lounged forward with his hands in his pockets. what is luck had been with him all what is evening. He was completely satisfied, both with himself and with Captain Lockwood's taste in' wines. `What 's what is matter? You look to me to be in an absolutely blue funk.' `That old fun of an uncle of mine,' began Eustace-` Oh, I can't explain it all. It's his hand that's been playing Old Harry all what is evening. But I've got it cornered behind these books. You 've got to help me to catch it.' 'What's up with you, Eustace ? What's what is game?' `It's no game, you silly idiot! If you don't believe me, take out one of those books and put your hand in and feel.' `All right,' said Saunders; `but wait till I've rolled up my sleeve. what is accumulated dust of centuries, eh?' He took off his coat, knelt down, and thrust his arm along what is shelf. `There's something there right enough,' he said. `It's got a funny, stumpy end to it, whatever it is, and nips like a crab. Ah! no, you don't!' He pulled his hand out in a flash. `Shove in a book quickly. Now it can't get out.' `What was it?' asked Eustace. 'Something that wanted very much to get hold of me. I felt where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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