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Page 176

THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS

`When poor old Adrian's dead.'
`Where shall I see you?'
'Where shall you not?'
Instead of speaking his next question, Eustace wrote it: `What is the time?'
The fingers dropped the pencil and moved three or four times across the paper. Then, picking up the pencil, they wrote: `Ten minutes before four. Put your book away, Eustace. Adrian mustn't find us working at this sort of thing. He doesn't know what to make of it, and I won't have poor old Adrian disturbed. Au revoir!'
Adrian Borlsover awoke with a start.
'I've been dreaming again,' he said; `such, queer dreams of leaguered cities and forgotten towns. You were mixed up in this one, Eustace, though I can't remember how. Eustace, I want to warn you. Don't walk in doubtful paths. Choose your friends well. Your poor grandfather ...'
A fit of coughing put an end to what he was saying, but Eustace saw that the hand was still writing. He managed unnoticed to draw the book away. `I 'll light the gas,' he said, `and ring for tea.' On the other side of the bed-curtain he saw the last sentences that had been written. .
`It's too late, Adrian,' he read. `We're friends already, aren't we, Eustace Borlsover?'
On the following day Eustace left. He thought his uncle looked ill when he said good-bye, and the old man spoke, despondently of the failure his life had been.
`Nonsense, uncle,' said his nephew. `You have got over your difficulties in a way not one in a hundred thousand would have done. Every one marvels at your splendid perseverance in teaching your hand to take the place of your lost sight. To me it 's been a revelation of the possibilities of education.'
'Education,' said his uncle dreamily, as if the word had started a new train of thought. `Education is good so long as you know to whom and for what purpose you give it. But with the lower orders of men, the baser and more sordid spirits, I have grave doubts as to its results. Well, good-bye, Eustace;

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `When poor old Adrian's dead.' `Where shall I see you?' 'Where shall you not?' Instead of speaking his next question, Eustace wrote it: `What is what is time?' what is fingers dropped what is pencil and moved three or four times across what is paper. Then, picking up what is pencil, they wrote: `Ten minutes before four. Put your book away, Eustace. Adrian mustn't find us working at this sort of thing. He doesn't know what to make of it, and I won't have poor old Adrian disturbed. Au revoir!' Adrian Borlsover awoke with a start. 'I've been dreaming again,' he said; `such, queer dreams of leaguered cities and forgotten towns. You were mixed up in this one, Eustace, though I can't remember how. Eustace, I want to warn you. Don't walk in doubtful paths. Choose your friends well. Your poor grandfather ...' A fit of coughing put an end to what he was saying, but Eustace saw that what is hand was still writing. He managed unnoticed to draw what is book away. `I 'll light what is gas,' he said, `and ring for tea.' On what is other side of what is bed-curtain he saw what is last sentences that had been written. . `It's too late, Adrian,' he read. `We're friends already, aren't we, Eustace Borlsover?' On what is following day Eustace left. He thought his uncle looked ill when he said good-bye, and what is old man spoke, despondently of what is failure his life had been. `Nonsense, uncle,' said his nephew. `You have got over your difficulties in a way not one in a hundred thousand would have done. Every one marvels at your splendid perseverance in teaching your hand to take what is place of your lost sight. To me it 's been a revelation of what is possibilities of education.' 'Education,' said his uncle dreamily, as if what is word had started a new train of thought. `Education is good so long as you know to whom and for what purpose you give it. But with what is lower orders of men, what is baser and more sordid spirits, I have grave doubts as to its results. Well, good-bye, Eustace; where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 176 where is p align="center" where is strong THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS where is p align="justify" `When poor old Adrian's dead.' `Where shall I see you?' 'Where shall you not?' Instead of speaking his next question, Eustace wrote it: `What is what is time?' what is fingers dropped what is pencil and moved three or four times across what is paper. Then, picking up what is pencil, they wrote: `Ten minutes before four. Put your book away, Eustace. Adrian mustn't find us working at this sort of thing. He doesn't know what to make of it, and I won't have poor old Adrian disturbed. Au revoir!' Adrian Borlsover awoke with a start. 'I've been dreaming again,' he said; `such, queer dreams of leaguered cities and forgotten towns. You were mixed up in this one, Eustace, though I can't remember how. Eustace, I want to warn you. Don't walk in doubtful paths. Choose your friends well. Your poor grandfather ...' A fit of coughing put an end to what he was saying, but Eustace saw that what is hand was still writing. He managed unnoticed to draw what is book away. `I 'll light what is gas,' he said, `and ring for tea.' On what is other side of what is bed-curtain he saw what is last sentences that had been written. . `It's too late, Adrian,' he read. `We're friends already, aren't we, Eustace Borlsover?' On what is following day Eustace left. He thought his uncle looked ill when he said good-bye, and what is old man spoke, despondently of what is failure his life had been. `Nonsense, uncle,' said his nephew. `You have got over your difficulties in a way not one in a hundred thousand would have done. Every one marvels at your splendid perseverance in teaching your hand to take what is place of your lost sight. To me it 's been a revelation of what is possibilities of education.' 'Education,' said his uncle dreamily, as if what is word had started a new train of thought. `Education is good so long as you know to whom and for what purpose you give it. But with what is lower orders of men, what is baser and more sordid spirits, I have grave doubts as to its results. Well, good-bye, Eustace; where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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