Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 166

MISS AVENAL

Then, as the days stole by in monotonous procession, her strength gradually came back to her; her cheeks, which before had had something of the horrible bloodless pallor of old ivory, were tinged with colour, and there shone on her long, dark hair a new lustre.
`I am already feeling so much stronger, nurse,' she said once, as leaning on my arm she walked by the waterless stream. `If you only knew what it is to have been without sympathy for as long as I have been; what it is to have been cut off from the strong currents of life, you would realize how thankful I am for all that you have given me.'
And yet what had I given her beyond my confidence? She had said that I sympathized with her. How could I sympathize with her, when I knew so little about her?
The letter which Miss Avenal told me that the doctor would send never came. `I cannot conceive how it has miscarried,' she said; `but after all the matter is of no importance, since you can now judge of me for yourself. Doctors claim too much and nurses far too little for themselves. It costs more to give sympathy hour after hour through tedious days and wakeful nights than to label with a learned name some case they can never even remotely understand.' It seemed that Miss Avenal shared that belief, so common among nervous hysterical women, that hers was no ordinary illness to be cured by ordinary means.
She had spoken of wakeful nights, and for the first few days after our arrival at Kildale she must have had but little sleep, though the heavy air of the valley, or perhaps the unaccustomed fragrance of the pine-trees, had on me an exactly opposite effect. Yet whenever I got up in the night to see if my patient in the next room was in need of anything, I always found her lying wide-eyed and awake on her bed by the open window.
`Go back to bed and to sleep, nurse,' she would say. `I rest more easily when I know that you are sleeping.'
As she grew stronger, our walks took us farther afield. Sometimes we followed the stream up the valley, and these walks

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Then, as what is days stole by in monotonous procession, her strength gradually came back to her; her cheeks, which before had had something of what is horrible bloodless pallor of old ivory, were tinged with colour, and there shone on her long, dark hair a new lustre. `I am already feeling so much stronger, nurse,' she said once, as leaning on my arm she walked by what is waterless stream. `If you only knew what it is to have been without sympathy for as long as I have been; what it is to have been cut off from what is strong currents of life, you would realize how thankful I am for all that you have given me.' And yet what had I given her beyond my confidence? She had said that I sympathized with her. How could I sympathize with her, when I knew so little about her? what is letter which Miss Avenal told me that what is doctor would send never came. `I cannot conceive how it has miscarried,' she said; `but after all what is matter is of no importance, since you can now judge of me for yourself. Doctors claim too much and nurses far too little for themselves. It costs more to give sympathy hour after hour through tedious days and wakeful nights than to label with a learned name some case they can never even remotely understand.' It seemed that Miss Avenal shared that belief, so common among nervous hysterical women, that hers was no ordinary illness to be cured by ordinary means. She had spoken of wakeful nights, and for what is first few days after our arrival at Kildale she must have had but little sleep, though what is heavy air of what is valley, or perhaps what is unaccustomed fragrance of what is pine-trees, had on me an exactly opposite effect. Yet whenever I got up in what is night to see if my patient in what is next room was in need of anything, I always found her lying wide-eyed and awake on her bed by what is open window. `Go back to bed and to sleep, nurse,' she would say. `I rest more easily when I know that you are sleeping.' As she grew stronger, our walks took us farther afield. Sometimes we followed what is stream up what is valley, and these walks where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 166 where is p align="center" where is strong MISS AVENAL where is p align="justify" Then, as what is days stole by in monotonous procession, her strength gradually came back to her; her cheeks, which before had had something of what is horrible bloodless pallor of old ivory, were tinged with colour, and there shone on her long, dark hair a new lustre. `I am already feeling so much stronger, nurse,' she said once, as leaning on my arm she walked by what is waterless stream. `If you only knew what it is to have been without sympathy for as long as I have been; what it is to have been cut off from what is strong currents of life, you would realize how thankful I am for all that you have given me.' And yet what had I given her beyond my confidence? She had said that I sympathized with her. How could I sympathize with her, when I knew so little about her? what is letter which Miss Avenal told me that what is doctor would send never came. `I cannot conceive how it has miscarried,' she said; `but after all what is matter is of no importance, since you can now judge of me for yourself. Doctors claim too much and nurses far too little for themselves. It costs more to give sympathy hour after hour through tedious days and wakeful nights than to label with a learned name some case they can never even remotely understand.' It seemed that Miss Avenal shared that belief, so common among nervous hysterical women, that hers was no ordinary illness to be cured by ordinary means. She had spoken of wakeful nights, and for what is first few days after our arrival at Kildale she must have had but little sleep, though what is heavy air of what is valley, or perhaps what is unaccustomed fragrance of what is pine-trees, had on me an exactly opposite effect. Yet whenever I got up in what is night to see if my patient in what is next room was in need of anything, I always found her lying wide-eyed and awake on her bed by what is open window. `Go back to bed and to sleep, nurse,' she would say. `I rest more easily when I know that you are sleeping.' As she grew stronger, our walks took us farther afield. Sometimes we followed what is stream up what is valley, and these walks where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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