Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 164

MISS AVENAL

I hope it will be as successful as the last. You certainly look as if you could do with another lease of life. Good-bye! So glad to have met you once again. You change at Maltley for the local line.'
The train started.
`You'll be alone,' he said, hurrying along the platform.
`Oh, yes,' Miss Avenal replied, `quite alone; it's part of the cure, you know.'
We stayed at Kildale Mill. I had been to Kildale Church before, the oldest Saxon church in the Riding and close to Kildale Cave. Kildale Church had seemed far enough from the string of villages that fringe the great plain, but Kildale Mill was two miles farther up the valley.
It was a very quiet valley, steep slopes, thickly wooded, rising from green meadows. The Kildale Beck ran down past the mill and there was swallowed, so that the course of the stream, except in flood-time, was only marked by dry boulders. Below the mill the dale was strangely silent, for, though the stream was there, the stream was dumb.
Kildale Mill was very old. I believe it is mentioned in Domesday. It was more of a farm than a mill, though the water-race is kept open and the water-wheel in repair for the sawing of timber. I think it was the quietest place I had ever seen. Above the valley were the moors, and many miles beyond the moors the sea.
Three rooms at the end of the house were reserved for Miss Avenal. A large room downstairs, which we used as a sittingand dining-room, faced on to sombre woods of larch and pine. Above were two bedrooms, reached from the room below by a separate stair and communicating with one another. Indeed these three rooms were quite cut off from the rest of the house, and except for the rare occasions when Miss Avenal came to Kildale they were not used. The lord of the manor had strict rules prohibiting his tenants from taking in summer visitors, so that there were only occasional cyclists on the valley roads, and no strangers on the moor.
I found Kildale intensely lonely. The house was reached

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I hope it will be as successful as what is last. You certainly look as if you could do with another lease of life. Good-bye! So glad to have met you once again. You change at Maltley for what is local line.' what is train started. `You'll be alone,' he said, hurrying along what is platform. `Oh, yes,' Miss Avenal replied, `quite alone; it's part of what is cure, you know.' We stayed at Kildale Mill. I had been to Kildale Church before, what is oldest Saxon church in what is Riding and close to Kildale Cave. Kildale Church had seemed far enough from what is string of villages that fringe what is great plain, but Kildale Mill was two miles farther up what is valley. It was a very quiet valley, steep slopes, thickly wooded, rising from green meadows. what is Kildale Beck ran down past what is mill and there was swallowed, so that what is course of what is stream, except in flood-time, was only marked by dry boulders. Below what is mill what is dale was strangely silent, for, though what is stream was there, what is stream was dumb. Kildale Mill was very old. I believe it is mentioned in Domesday. It was more of a farm than a mill, though what is water-race is kept open and what is water-wheel in repair for what is sawing of timber. I think it was what is quietest place I had ever seen. Above what is valley were what is moors, and many miles beyond what is moors what is sea. Three rooms at what is end of what is house were reserved for Miss Avenal. A large room downstairs, which we used as a sittingand dining-room, faced on to sombre woods of larch and pine. Above were two bedrooms, reached from what is room below by a separate stair and communicating with one another. Indeed these three rooms were quite cut off from what is rest of what is house, and except for what is rare occasions when Miss Avenal came to Kildale they were not used. what is lord of what is manor had strict rules prohibiting his tenants from taking in summer what is ors, so that there were only occasional cyclists on what is valley roads, and no strangers on what is moor. I found Kildale intensely lonely. what is house was reached where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 164 where is p align="center" where is strong MISS AVENAL where is p align="justify" I hope it will be as successful as what is last. You certainly look as if you could do with another lease of life. Good-bye! So glad to have met you once again. You change at Maltley for the local line.' what is train started. `You'll be alone,' he said, hurrying along what is platform. `Oh, yes,' Miss Avenal replied, `quite alone; it's part of the cure, you know.' We stayed at Kildale Mill. I had been to Kildale Church before, what is oldest Saxon church in what is Riding and close to Kildale Cave. Kildale Church had seemed far enough from what is string of villages that fringe what is great plain, but Kildale Mill was two miles farther up what is valley. It was a very quiet valley, steep slopes, thickly wooded, rising from green meadows. what is Kildale Beck ran down past what is mill and there was swallowed, so that what is course of what is stream, except in flood-time, was only marked by dry boulders. Below what is mill the dale was strangely silent, for, though what is stream was there, the stream was dumb. Kildale Mill was very old. I believe it is mentioned in Domesday. It was more of a farm than a mill, though what is water-race is kept open and what is water-wheel in repair for what is sawing of timber. I think it was what is quietest place I had ever seen. Above what is valley were what is moors, and many miles beyond what is moors what is sea. Three rooms at what is end of what is house were reserved for Miss Avenal. A large room downstairs, which we used as a sittingand dining-room, faced on to sombre woods of larch and pine. Above were two bedrooms, reached from what is room below by a separate stair and communicating with one another. Indeed these three rooms were quite cut off from what is rest of what is house, and except for what is rare occasions when Miss Avenal came to Kildale they were not used. what is lord of what is manor had strict rules prohibiting his tenants from taking in summer what is ors, so that there were only occasional cyclists on what is valley roads, and no strangers on what is moor. I found Kildale intensely lonely. what is house was reached where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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