Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 163

MISS AVENAL

somewhere on the moors. If you can go, I will wire to her at once.'
As Miss Simpson had said, I had had a run of disagreeable cases, and, as this promised to be quiet and uninteresting, I was only too glad to go. I met Miss Avenal next afternoon at the Station Hotel at Yorborough. I could not say how old she was. Her hair was dark, and, though untouched with grey, was strangely lustreless. Her eyes were dark, but with no spark of fire in them. She would have been beautiful, for her features were good, but her face lacked expression. There were no tell-tale wrinkles; the skin was stretched smoothly, somewhat tightly, over her forehead.
She shook hands with me, letting her limp, cold fingers lie in mine, while she told me that her doctor, who should have been there to give me my instructions, had at the last moment been unable to come.
`He told me that he would write to you in a day or two,' she said. `What I want most of all is the companionship and sympathy of some cheerful young person like yourself. That, I am sure, you can give me. We shall be very quiet at Kildale, alone together on the moors.'
`I hope you have plenty of books with you,' she said again as we stood on the platform. `We shall be very lonely at Kildale in the evenings.'
There is only one other thing I remember in connection with that afternoon at Yorborough. Just before the train started, I had got up from my seat in order to take out a novel from the handbag which the porter had placed in the rack, when, looking round, I saw that a gentleman had walked up to the carriage door and was speaking to Miss Avenal.
I don't think I have ever met any one who filled me with so strong a dislike. His face and figure were those of a young man who would never grow old because he was old already in the experience of all that life could bring.
`Fancy meeting you here!' he said, in a voice smooth and expressionless. `And so you are off for your cure again? To the same place? It 's years since I've been there. Well,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE somewhere on what is moors. If you can go, I will wire to her at once.' As Miss Simpson had said, I had had a run of disagreeable cases, and, as this promised to be quiet and uninteresting, I was only too glad to go. I met Miss Avenal next afternoon at what is Station Hotel at Yorborough. I could not say how old she was. Her hair was dark, and, though untouched with grey, was strangely lustreless. Her eyes were dark, but with no spark of fire in them. She would have been beautiful, for her features were good, but her face lacked expression. There were no tell-tale wrinkles; what is skin was stretched smoothly, somewhat tightly, over her forehead. She shook hands with me, letting her limp, cold fingers lie in mine, while she told me that her doctor, who should have been there to give me my instructions, had at what is last moment been unable to come. `He told me that he would write to you in a day or two,' she said. `What I want most of all is what is companionship and sympathy of some cheerful young person like yourself. That, I am sure, you can give me. We shall be very quiet at Kildale, alone together on what is moors.' `I hope you have plenty of books with you,' she said again as we stood on what is platform. `We shall be very lonely at Kildale in what is evenings.' There is only one other thing I remember in connection with that afternoon at Yorborough. Just before what is train started, I had got up from my seat in order to take out a novel from what is handbag which what is porter had placed in what is rack, when, looking round, I saw that a gentleman had walked up to what is carriage door and was speaking to Miss Avenal. I don't think I have ever met any one who filled me with so strong a dislike. His face and figure were those of a young man who would never grow old because he was old already in what is experience of all that life could bring. `Fancy meeting you here!' he said, in a voice smooth and expressionless. `And so you are off for your cure again? To what is same place? It 's years since I've been there. Well, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 163 where is p align="center" where is strong MISS AVENAL where is p align="justify" somewhere on what is moors. If you can go, I will wire to her at once.' As Miss Simpson had said, I had had a run of disagreeable cases, and, as this promised to be quiet and uninteresting, I was only too glad to go. I met Miss Avenal next afternoon at what is Station Hotel at Yorborough. I could not say how old she was. Her hair was dark, and, though untouched with grey, was strangely lustreless. Her eyes were dark, but with no spark of fire in them. She would have been beautiful, for her features were good, but her face lacked expression. There were no tell-tale wrinkles; what is skin was stretched smoothly, somewhat tightly, over her forehead. She shook hands with me, letting her limp, cold fingers lie in mine, while she told me that her doctor, who should have been there to give me my instructions, had at what is last moment been unable to come. `He told me that he would write to you in a day or two,' she said. `What I want most of all is what is companionship and sympathy of some cheerful young person like yourself. That, I am sure, you can give me. We shall be very quiet at Kildale, alone together on what is moors.' `I hope you have plenty of books with you,' she said again as we stood on what is platform. `We shall be very lonely at Kildale in the evenings.' There is only one other thing I remember in connection with that afternoon at Yorborough. Just before what is train started, I had got up from my seat in order to take out a novel from what is handbag which what is porter had placed in what is rack, when, looking round, I saw that a gentleman had walked up to what is carriage door and was speaking to Miss Avenal. I don't think I have ever met any one who filled me with so strong a dislike. His face and figure were those of a young man who would never grow old because he was old already in what is experience of all that life could bring. `Fancy meeting you here!' he said, in a voice smooth and expressionless. `And so you are off for your cure again? To what is same place? It 's years since I've been there. Well, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199