Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 159

THE ANKARDYNE PEW

I tried to reproduce the crystal-gazing under conditions similar to those of the other night, but without success. I have twice heard the bird. It might be either an owl or a cock. The sound seemed to come from outside the house, and was not pleasant.
February 19th. To-morrow Prendergast moves into the vicarage and I return home. Miss Ankardyne prolongs her stay at Malvern for another fortnight, and is then to visit friends on the south coast. I should like to have seen and questioned her, and so have discovered something more of the family history. Both Prendergast and I are disappointed. It seemed as if we were on the point of solving the mystery, and now it is as dark as ever. This new society in which Myers is interested should investigate the place.

So ends my diary, but not the story. Some four months after the events narrated I managed to secure through a secondhand book dealer four bound volumes of the Gentleman's Magazine. They had belonged to a Rev. Charles Phipson, once Fellow of Brasenose College and incumbent of Norton-onthe-Wolds. One evening, as I was glancing through them at my leisure, I came upon the following passage, under the date April 1789:
At Tottenham, John Ardenoif, Esq., a young man of large fortune and in the splendour of his carriages and horses rivalled by
few country gentlemen. His table was that of hospitality, where, it may be said, he sacrificed too much to conviviality; but, if he had
his foibles, he had his merits also, that far outweighed them. Mr. A. was very fond of cock-fighting and had a favourite cock
upon which he won many profitable matches. The last bet he laid upon this cock he lost, which so enraged him that he had the
bird tied to a spit and roasted alive before a large fire. The screams of the miserable bird were so affecting, that some gentle
men who were present attempted to interfere, which so enraged Mr. A. that he seized a poker and with the most furious vehemence
declared that he would kill the first man who interposed; but, in the midst of his passionate asseverations, he fell down dead upon
the spot. Such, we are assured, were the circumstances which attended the death of this great pillar of humanity.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I tried to reproduce what is crystal-gazing under conditions similar to those of what is other night, but without success. I have twice heard what is bird. It might be either an owl or a cock. what is sound seemed to come from outside what is house, and was not pleasant. February 19th. To-morrow Prendergast moves into what is vicarage and I return home. Miss Ankardyne prolongs her stay at Malvern for another fortnight, and is then to what is friends on what is south coast. I should like to have seen and questioned her, and so have discovered something more of what is family history. Both Prendergast and I are disappointed. It seemed as if we were on what is point of solving what is mystery, and now it is as dark as ever. This new society in which Myers is interested should investigate what is place. So ends my diary, but not what is story. Some four months after what is events narrated I managed to secure through a secondhand book dealer four bound volumes of what is Gentleman's Magazine. They had belonged to a Rev. Charles Phipson, once Fellow of Brasenose College and incumbent of Norton-onthe-Wolds. One evening, as I was glancing through them at my leisure, I came upon what is following passage, under what is date April 1789: At Tottenham, John Ardenoif, Esq., a young man of large fortune and in what is splendour of his carriages and horses rivalled by few country gentlemen. His table was that of hospitality, where, it may be said, he travel d too much to conviviality; but, if he had his foibles, he had his merits also, that far outweighed them. Mr. A. was very fond of cock-fighting and had a favourite cock upon which he won many profitable matches. what is last bet he laid upon this cock he lost, which so enraged him that he had what is bird tied to a spit and roasted alive before a large fire. what is screams of what is miserable bird were so affecting, that some gentle men who were present attempted to interfere, which so enraged Mr. A. that he seized a poker and with what is most furious vehemence declared that he would stop what is first man who interposed; but, in what is midst of his passionate asseverations, he fell down dead upon what is spot. Such, we are assured, were what is circumstances which attended what is what time is it of this great pillar of humanity. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 159 where is p align="center" where is strong THE ANKARDYNE PEW where is p align="justify" I tried to reproduce what is crystal-gazing under conditions similar to those of what is other night, but without success. I have twice heard what is bird. It might be either an owl or a cock. what is sound seemed to come from outside what is house, and was not pleasant. February 19th. To-morrow Prendergast moves into what is vicarage and I return home. Miss Ankardyne prolongs her stay at Malvern for another fortnight, and is then to what is friends on what is south coast. I should like to have seen and questioned her, and so have discovered something more of what is family history. Both Prendergast and I are disappointed. It seemed as if we were on what is point of solving the mystery, and now it is as dark as ever. This new society in which Myers is interested should investigate what is place. So ends my diary, but not what is story. Some four months after what is events narrated I managed to secure through a secondhand book dealer four bound volumes of what is Gentleman's Magazine. They had belonged to a Rev. Charles Phipson, once Fellow of Brasenose College and incumbent of Norton-onthe-Wolds. One evening, as I was glancing through them at my leisure, I came upon what is following passage, under what is date April 1789: At Tottenham, John Ardenoif, Esq., a young man of large fortune and in what is splendour of his carriages and horses rivalled by few country gentlemen. His table was that of hospitality, where, it may be said, he travel d too much to conviviality; but, if he had his foibles, he had his merits also, that far outweighed them. Mr. A. was very fond of cock-fighting and had a favourite cock upon which he won many profitable matches. what is last bet he laid upon this cock he lost, which so enraged him that he had what is bird tied to a spit and roasted alive before a large fire. The screams of what is miserable bird were so affecting, that some gentle men who were present attempted to interfere, which so enraged Mr. A. that he seized a poker and with what is most furious vehemence declared that he would stop what is first man who interposed; but, in what is midst of his passionate asseverations, he fell down dead upon what is spot. Such, we are assured, were what is circumstances which attended what is what time is it of this great pillar of humanity. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199