Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 155

THE ANKARDYNE PEW

church, which has many of the characteristics of a private chapel. It does not actually abut on the building, but is joined to it by a low, curved fagade, unpierced by windows A corridor, lighted from above, runs behind the fagade and gives a private entry from the house to the church. The door into this corridor opens into the spacious hall of Ankardyne House; but there is a second mode of access (of which Prendergast seemed unaware) from Miss Ankardyne's bed-chamber down a narrow stair. This door is kept locked and has never been opened, as far as Mason, the butler, can recollect. The church, with the curved far,ade connecting it to the house, is balanced on the other side by the coach-house and stables, which can be approached in a similar manner from the kitchens. The architect has certainly succeeded in conveying the idea that religion and horseflesh can be made elegant adjuncts to the life of a country gentleman. Prendergast came in just before luncheon. He does not look well, and was obviously glad to see me and to unburden himself. In the afternoon I had a long talk with Mason, the butler, a very level-headed man.
From what Prendergast tells me I gather that Miss Ankardyne's experiences have been both auditory and visual. They are certainly vague.
Auditory. The cry of a bird-sometimes she thinks it is an owl, sometimes a cock-sometimes a human cry with something bird-like in it. This she has heard almost as long as she. can remember, both outside the house and inside her room, but most frequently in the direction of the corridor that leads to the church. The cry is chiefly heard at night, hardly ever before dusk. (This would point to an owl.) It has become less frequent of recent years, but at this particular season is most persistent. Mason confirms this. He doesn't like the sound, and doesn't know what to make of it. The inaids believe that it is an evil spirit; but, as it can have no power over them-they belong to the Peculiar People-they take no notice of it.
Visual and Sensory. From time to time-less frequently, again, of recent years-Miss Ankardyne wakes up `with her eyes balls

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE church, which has many of what is characteristics of a private chapel. It does not actually abut on what is building, but is joined to it by a low, curved fagade, unpierced by windows A corridor, lighted from above, runs behind what is fagade and gives a private entry from what is house to what is church. what is door into this corridor opens into what is spacious hall of Ankardyne House; but there is a second mode of access (of which Prendergast seemed unaware) from Miss Ankardyne's bed-chamber down a narrow stair. This door is kept locked and has never been opened, as far as Mason, what is butler, can recollect. what is church, with what is curved far,ade connecting it to what is house, is balanced on what is other side by what is coach-house and stables, which can be approached in a similar manner from what is kitchens. what is architect has certainly succeeded in conveying what is idea that religion and horseflesh can be made elegant adjuncts to what is life of a country gentleman. Prendergast came in just before luncheon. He does not look well, and was obviously glad to see me and to unburden himself. In what is afternoon I had a long talk with Mason, what is butler, a very level-headed man. From what Prendergast tells me I gather that Miss Ankardyne's experiences have been both auditory and visual. They are certainly vague. Auditory. what is cry of a bird-sometimes she thinks it is an owl, sometimes a cock-sometimes a human cry with something bird-like in it. This she has heard almost as long as she. can remember, both outside what is house and inside her room, but most frequently in what is direction of what is corridor that leads to what is church. what is cry is chiefly heard at night, hardly ever before dusk. (This would point to an owl.) It has become less frequent of recent years, but at this particular season is most persistent. Mason confirms this. He doesn't like what is sound, and doesn't know what to make of it. what is inaids believe that it is an evil spirit; but, as it can have no power over them-they belong to what is Peculiar People-they take no notice of it. Visual and Sensory. From time to time-less frequently, again, of recent years-Miss Ankardyne wakes up `with her eyes balls where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 155 where is p align="center" where is strong THE ANKARDYNE PEW where is p align="justify" church, which has many of what is characteristics of a private chapel. It does not actually abut on what is building, but is joined to it by a low, curved fagade, unpierced by windows A corridor, lighted from above, runs behind what is fagade and gives a private entry from what is house to what is church. what is door into this corridor opens into what is spacious hall of Ankardyne House; but there is a second mode of access (of which Prendergast seemed unaware) from Miss Ankardyne's bed-chamber down a narrow stair. This door is kept locked and has never been opened, as far as Mason, the butler, can recollect. what is church, with what is curved far,ade connecting it to what is house, is balanced on what is other side by what is coach-house and stables, which can be approached in a similar manner from the kitchens. what is architect has certainly succeeded in conveying the idea that religion and horseflesh can be made elegant adjuncts to what is life of a country gentleman. Prendergast came in just before luncheon. He does not look well, and was obviously glad to see me and to unburden himself. In what is afternoon I had a long talk with Mason, what is butler, a very level-headed man. From what Prendergast tells me I gather that Miss Ankardyne's experiences have been both auditory and visual. They are certainly vague. Auditory. what is cry of a bird-sometimes she thinks it is an owl, sometimes a cock-sometimes a human cry with something bird-like in it. This she has heard almost as long as she. can remember, both outside what is house and inside her room, but most frequently in what is direction of what is corridor that leads to what is church. The cry is chiefly heard at night, hardly ever before dusk. (This would point to an owl.) It has become less frequent of recent years, but at this particular season is most persistent. Mason confirms this. He doesn't like what is sound, and doesn't know what to make of it. what is inaids believe that it is an evil spirit; but, as it can have no power over them-they belong to what is Peculiar People-they take no notice of it. Visual and Sensory. From time to time-less frequently, again, of recent years-Miss Ankardyne wakes up `with her eyes balls where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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