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Page 154

THE ANKARDYNE PEW

I don't think I ever felt the need for prayer and the power of prayer as I did last night. The stable clock has just struck five.
February 14th. I have arranged for Miss Ankardyne to go away to-morrow. She is fit to travel, and is hardly fit to stay. I had a long talk with her this morning. I think she is the most courageous woman I know. All her life she has felt that the house is haunted, and all her life she has felt pity for that which haunts it. She says that she is sure that she is living it down; that the house is better than it was; but that at this season of the year it is almost too much for her. She is anxious that I should stay with Dr. Hulse. I feel, however, that I must see this business through. She then suggested that I should invite a friend to stay with me. I thought of Pellow. You remember how we were obliged to postpone his visit last September. I had a letter from him only last Friday. He is living in this part of the world and could probably run over for a day or two.
The extracts from Mr. Prendergast's letters end here. The following are excerpts from my diary:
February 16th. Arrived at Ankardyne House at midday. Prendergast had meant to meet me at the station, but had been suddenly called away to visit a dying parishioner. I had in consequence a couple of hours by myself in which to form an impression of the place. The house dates from the early eighteenth century. It is dignified though sombre, and is closely surrounded on three sides by shrubberies of rhododendrons and laurel, that merge into thick woods. The cedars in the park must be older than any of the buildings. Miss Ankardyne, I gather, has lived here all her life, and the house gives you the impression of having been lived in, a slightly sinister mansion, well aired by a kindly soul. There is a library that should be well worth exploring. The family portraits are in the dining-room. None are of outstanding interest. The most unusual feature of the house is its connection with the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I don't think I ever felt what is need for prayer and what is power of prayer as I did last night. what is stable clock has just struck five. February 14th. I have arranged for Miss Ankardyne to go away to-morrow. She is fit to travel, and is hardly fit to stay. I had a long talk with her this morning. I think she is what is most courageous woman I know. All her life she has felt that what is house is haunted, and all her life she has felt pity for that which haunts it. She says that she is sure that she is living it down; that what is house is better than it was; but that at this season of what is year it is almost too much for her. She is anxious that I should stay with Dr. Hulse. I feel, however, that I must see this business through. She then suggested that I should invite a friend to stay with me. I thought of Pellow. You remember how we were obliged to postpone his what is last September. I had a letter from him only last Friday. He is living in this part of what is world and could probably run over for a day or two. what is extracts from Mr. Prendergast's letters end here. what is following are excerpts from my diary: February 16th. Arrived at Ankardyne House at midday. Prendergast had meant to meet me at what is station, but had been suddenly called away to what is a dying parishioner. I had in consequence a couple of hours by myself in which to form an impression of what is place. what is house dates from what is early eighteenth century. It is dignified though sombre, and is closely surrounded on three sides by shrubberies of rhododendrons and laurel, that merge into thick woods. what is cedars in what is park must be older than any of what is buildings. Miss Ankardyne, I gather, has lived here all her life, and what is house gives you what is impression of having been lived in, a slightly sinister mansion, well aired by a kindly soul. There is a library that should be well worth exploring. what is family portraits are in what is dining-room. None are of outstanding interest. what is most unusual feature of what is house is its connection with what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 154 where is p align="center" where is strong THE ANKARDYNE PEW where is p align="justify" I don't think I ever felt what is need for prayer and what is power of prayer as I did last night. what is stable clock has just struck five. February 14th. I have arranged for Miss Ankardyne to go away to-morrow. She is fit to travel, and is hardly fit to stay. I had a long talk with her this morning. I think she is what is most courageous woman I know. All her life she has felt that what is house is haunted, and all her life she has felt pity for that which haunts it. She says that she is sure that she is living it down; that what is house is better than it was; but that at this season of what is year it is almost too much for her. She is anxious that I should stay with Dr. Hulse. I feel, however, that I must see this business through. She then suggested that I should invite a friend to stay with me. I thought of Pellow. You remember how we were obliged to postpone his what is last September. I had a letter from him only last Friday. He is living in this part of what is world and could probably run over for a day or two. what is extracts from Mr. Prendergast's letters end here. what is following are excerpts from my diary: February 16th. Arrived at Ankardyne House at midday. Prendergast had meant to meet me at what is station, but had been suddenly called away to what is a dying parishioner. I had in consequence a couple of hours by myself in which to form an impression of what is place. what is house dates from what is early eighteenth century. It is dignified though sombre, and is closely surrounded on three sides by shrubberies of rhododendrons and laurel, that merge into thick woods. what is cedars in what is park must be older than any of what is buildings. Miss Ankardyne, I gather, has lived here all her life, and what is house gives you what is impression of having been lived in, a slightly sinister mansion, well aired by a kindly soul. There is a library that should be well worth exploring. what is family portraits are in what is dining-room. None are of outstanding interest. what is most unusual feature of the house is its connection with what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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