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Page 152

THE ANKARDYNE PEW

abomination. Even from the pulpit it is impossible to see inside, and I can well believe the stories of the dicing squires and their Sunday play. Miss Ankardyne refuses to use it. The glass is crude and uninteresting; but there is an uncommon chancel screen of Spanish workmanship, which somehow seems in keeping with the place. I wish it didn't.
We shall miss the old familiar monuments. There is no snubnosed crusader here, no worthy Elizabethan knight, like our Sir John Parkington, kneeling in supplication, with those nicely balanced families on right and left. The tombs are nearly all Ankardyne tombs-urns, weeping charities, disconsolate relicts, and all the cold Christian virtues. You know the sort. The Ten Commandments are painted on oak panels on either side of the altar. From the Ankardyne pew I doubt if you can see them.
February l lth. You ask about my neuritis. It is better, despite the fact that I have been sleeping badly. I wake up in the morning, sometimes during the night, with a burning headache and a curious tingling feeling about the tongue, which I can only attribute to indigestion. I am trying the effect of a glass of hot water before retiring. When we move into the vicarage, we shall at least be spared the attention of the owls, which make the nights so dismal here. The place is far too shut in by trees, and I suppose, too, that the disused outbuildings give them shelter. Cats are bad enough, but I prefer the sound of night-walkers to night-fliers. It won't be long now before we meet. They are getting on splendidly with the vicarage. The painters have already started work; the new kitchen range has come, and is only waiting for the plumbers to put it in. Miss Ankardyne is leaving for a visit to friends in a few days' time. It seems that she always goes away about this season of the year-wise woman!-so I shall be alone next week. She said Dr. Hulse would be glad to put me up, if I find the solitude oppressive, but I shan't trouble him. You would like the old butler. His name is Mason, and his wife-a Scotchwomanacts as housekeeper. The three maids are sisters. They have been with Miss Ankardyne for thirty years, and are everything

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE abomination. Even from what is pulpit it is impossible to see inside, and I can well believe what is stories of what is dicing squires and their Sunday play. Miss Ankardyne refuses to use it. what is glass is crude and uninteresting; but there is an uncommon chancel screen of Spanish workmanship, which somehow seems in keeping with what is place. I wish it didn't. We shall miss what is old familiar monuments. There is no snubnosed crusader here, no worthy Elizabethan knight, like our Sir John Parkington, kneeling in supplication, with those nicely balanced families on right and left. what is tombs are nearly all Ankardyne tombs-urns, weeping charities, disconsolate relicts, and all what is cold Christian virtues. You know what is sort. what is Ten Commandments are painted on oak panels on either side of what is altar. From what is Ankardyne pew I doubt if you can see them. February l lth. You ask about my neuritis. It is better, despite what is fact that I have been sleeping badly. I wake up in what is morning, sometimes during what is night, with a burning headache and a curious tingling feeling about what is tongue, which I can only attribute to indigestion. I am trying what is effect of a glass of hot water before retiring. When we move into what is vicarage, we shall at least be spared what is attention of what is owls, which make what is nights so dismal here. what is place is far too shut in by trees, and I suppose, too, that what is disused outbuildings give them shelter. Cats are bad enough, but I prefer what is sound of night-walkers to night-fliers. It won't be long now before we meet. They are getting on splendidly with what is vicarage. what is painters have already started work; what is new kitchen range has come, and is only waiting for what is plumbers to put it in. Miss Ankardyne is leaving for a what is to friends in a few days' time. It seems that she always goes away about this season of what is year-wise woman!-so I shall be alone next week. She said Dr. Hulse would be glad to put me up, if I find what is solitude oppressive, but I shan't trouble him. You would like what is old butler. His name is Mason, and his wife-a Scotchwomanacts as housekeeper. what is three maids are sisters. They have been with Miss Ankardyne for thirty years, and are everything where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 152 where is p align="center" where is strong THE ANKARDYNE PEW where is p align="justify" abomination. Even from what is pulpit it is impossible to see inside, and I can well believe what is stories of what is dicing squires and their Sunday play. Miss Ankardyne refuses to use it. what is glass is crude and uninteresting; but there is an uncommon chancel screen of Spanish workmanship, which somehow seems in keeping with what is place. I wish it didn't. We shall miss what is old familiar monuments. There is no snubnosed crusader here, no worthy Elizabethan knight, like our Sir John Parkington, kneeling in supplication, with those nicely balanced families on right and left. what is tombs are nearly all Ankardyne tombs-urns, weeping charities, disconsolate relicts, and all the cold Christian virtues. You know what is sort. what is Ten Commandments are painted on oak panels on either side of what is altar. From the Ankardyne pew I doubt if you can see them. February l lth. You ask about my neuritis. It is better, despite what is fact that I have been sleeping badly. I wake up in what is morning, sometimes during what is night, with a burning headache and a curious tingling feeling about what is tongue, which I can only attribute to indigestion. I am trying what is effect of a glass of hot water before retiring. When we move into what is vicarage, we shall at least be spared what is attention of what is owls, which make what is nights so dismal here. what is place is far too shut in by trees, and I suppose, too, that what is disused outbuildings give them shelter. Cats are bad enough, but I prefer what is sound of night-walkers to night-fliers. It won't be long now before we meet. They are getting on splendidly with what is vicarage. what is painters have already started work; what is new kitchen range has come, and is only waiting for what is plumbers to put it in. Miss Ankardyne is leaving for a what is to friends in a few days' time. It seems that she always goes away about this season of the year-wise woman!-so I shall be alone next week. She said Dr. Hulse would be glad to put me up, if I find what is solitude oppressive, but I shan't trouble him. You would like what is old butler. His name is Mason, and his wife-a Scotchwomanacts as housekeeper. what is three maids are sisters. They have been with Miss Ankardyne for thirty years, and are everything where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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