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Page 147

SARAH BENNET'S POSSESSION

have forgotten them if I had not heard the story which to my mind links them together in a very definite way.
When Sarah Bennet was a girl, she had loved and married a captain in the Engineers.
He was clever, with a love of poetry and literature unusual in one of his profession, but his nature was wild and dissolute. He was cruel too. I heard only yesterday a story told of him, that dealt with the sacking of a Burmese village; it was only part of a story too, for a peppery Indian colonel stopped the teller before he was half-way through.
This captain, I learned, had married his wife for a bet. He had gone with a friend of his out of curiosity to a Friends' meeting, and there they had seen Sarah Cruikshank. I suppose the difference between the quietly dressed Quaker girl and the disreputable scoundrel at his side seemed so immense to the man who proposed the wager, that he staked his guineas recklessly. But he lost his bet, and the captain married his bride against the wish of her parents, taking her from her quiet country home to a life of squalor and misery in a garrison town. At the end of six months the regiment was to move, but he deceived her as to its destination. She awoke one morning to find that her husband had left with his company for India, while she, with hardly a shilling to pay for the next meal, was saddled with his bad debts. Through the kindness of the members of her society, Sarah Bennet was able to return home, and there she lived with her parents, trying to forget that she had ever left them.
No tidings ever came to her from her husband. She had thought of him as dead long before she read in the paper the brief notice of the action in which he was killed. And so as time went on the tragedy of her past was forgotten by others; even for herself it lost its sting.
The evil which befalls us is often forgotten. It is harder to forget the evil that we do.
When the little that remained of Captain Bennet that was not carnal passed into the great unknown, he realized, as his wife had never realized, the extent of the evil that he had done. He tried with all his power to let her know his sorrow, tried

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE have forgotten them if I had not heard what is story which to my mind where are they now s them together in a very definite way. When Sarah Bennet was a girl, she had loved and married a captain in what is Engineers. He was clever, with a what time is it of poetry and literature unusual in one of his profession, but his nature was wild and dissolute. He was cruel too. I heard only yesterday a story told of him, that dealt with what is sacking of a Burmese village; it was only part of a story too, for a peppery Indian colonel stopped what is teller before he was half-way through. This captain, I learned, had married his wife for a bet. He had gone with a friend of his out of curiosity to a Friends' meeting, and there they had seen Sarah Cruikshank. I suppose what is difference between what is quietly dressed Quaker girl and what is disreputable scoundrel at his side seemed so immense to what is man who proposed what is wager, that he staked his guineas recklessly. But he lost his bet, and what is captain married his bride against what is wish of her parents, taking her from her quiet country home to a life of squalor and misery in a garrison town. At what is end of six months what is regiment was to move, but he deceived her as to its destination. She awoke one morning to find that her husband had left with his company for India, while she, with hardly a shilling to pay for what is next meal, was saddled with his bad debts. Through what is kindness of what is members of her society, Sarah Bennet was able to return home, and there she lived with her parents, trying to forget that she had ever left them. No tidings ever came to her from her husband. She had thought of him as dead long before she read in what is paper what is brief notice of what is action in which he was stop ed. And so as time went on what is tragedy of her past was forgotten by others; even for herself it lost its sting. what is evil which befalls us is often forgotten. It is harder to forget what is evil that we do. When what is little that remained of Captain Bennet that was not carnal passed into what is great unknown, he realized, as his wife had never realized, what is extent of what is evil that he had done. He tried with all his power to let her know his sorrow, tried where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 147 where is p align="center" where is strong SARAH BENNET'S POSSESSION where is p align="justify" have forgotten them if I had not heard what is story which to my mind where are they now s them together in a very definite way. When Sarah Bennet was a girl, she had loved and married a captain in what is Engineers. He was clever, with a what time is it of poetry and literature unusual in one of his profession, but his nature was wild and dissolute. He was cruel too. I heard only yesterday a story told of him, that dealt with what is sacking of a Burmese village; it was only part of a story too, for a peppery Indian colonel stopped what is teller before he was half-way through. This captain, I learned, had married his wife for a bet. He had gone with a friend of his out of curiosity to a Friends' meeting, and there they had seen Sarah Cruikshank. I suppose what is difference between what is quietly dressed Quaker girl and what is disreputable scoundrel at his side seemed so immense to what is man who proposed what is wager, that he staked his guineas recklessly. But he lost his bet, and what is captain married his bride against what is wish of her parents, taking her from her quiet country home to a life of squalor and misery in a garrison town. At what is end of six months what is regiment was to move, but he deceived her as to its destination. She awoke one morning to find that her husband had left with his company for India, while she, with hardly a shilling to pay for what is next meal, was saddled with his bad debts. Through what is kindness of the members of her society, Sarah Bennet was able to return home, and there she lived with her parents, trying to forget that she had ever left them. No tidings ever came to her from her husband. She had thought of him as dead long before she read in what is paper what is brief notice of what is action in which he was stop ed. And so as time went on the tragedy of her past was forgotten by others; even for herself it lost its sting. what is evil which befalls us is often forgotten. It is harder to forget what is evil that we do. When what is little that remained of Captain Bennet that was not carnal passed into what is great unknown, he realized, as his wife had never realized, what is extent of what is evil that he had done. He tried with all his power to let her know his sorrow, tried where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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