Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 144

SARAH BENNET'S POSSESSION

The flickering light of the fire had for the time being died down; the flames curling under a huge log of wood were too intent on searching for ` a hold to show themselves, except in sudden darts and flashes.
Mrs. Bennet sat in her high-backed chair slightly turned from us, looking into the garden beyond. A pencil and paper lay on her lap, but her hands were folded.
`Well, is it to be any one in the room?' asked the youngest princess. `That rules out Frank, he being nobody. I think we might be allowed a little more light.'
For three minutes no one spoke.
`Time!' said Frank. `Light the lamp and let's seethe results. Give me the papers, and we'll guess who they are. So you 've been drawing, auntie?' he said as he took her sheet, `I thought you had gone to sleep.'
Frank's was the first portrait we saw-a most spirited sketch of a goose. `You see,' he explained, `if I am to be snubbed by being called nobody, I must have my revenge.'
Then the rest followed, amusing caricatures, for the most part unrecognizable.
Suddenly Frank started up.
`Who in the world is that?' he said.
He held in his hand the piece of paper that had been in Mrs. Bennet's lap. On it was a drawing, as cleverly executed a sketch as I have ever seen of a man, a young man, dressed in an officer's uniform of half a century ago. He was kneeling with his hands clasped in the attitude of supplication. His features, coarse and ugly as they were, were cast into an expression that seemed to demand pity. It was not entirely a black-and-white drawing; for on the side of his coat was a little patch of red, put in with coloured chalk. There was a little pool of red on the ground on which he knelt.
Frank looked puzzled. `I never dreamed you could draw as well as that, auntie. But it was to be someone present in the room!'
Mrs. Bennet was still gazing out into the night.
`Well, children,' she said, `what have you been playing at?

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The flickering light of what is fire had for what is time being died down; what is flames curling under a huge log of wood were too intent on searching for ` a hold to show themselves, except in sudden darts and flashes. Mrs. Bennet sat in her high-backed chair slightly turned from us, looking into what is garden beyond. A pencil and paper lay on her lap, but her hands were folded. `Well, is it to be any one in what is room?' asked what is youngest princess. `That rules out Frank, he being nobody. I think we might be allowed a little more light.' For three minutes no one spoke. `Time!' said Frank. `Light what is lamp and let's seethe results. Give me what is papers, and we'll guess who they are. So you 've been drawing, auntie?' he said as he took her sheet, `I thought you had gone to sleep.' Frank's was what is first portrait we saw-a most spirited sketch of a goose. `You see,' he explained, `if I am to be snubbed by being called nobody, I must have my revenge.' Then what is rest followed, amusing caricatures, for what is most part unrecognizable. Suddenly Frank started up. `Who in what is world is that?' he said. He held in his hand what is piece of paper that had been in Mrs. Bennet's lap. On it was a drawing, as cleverly executed a sketch as I have ever seen of a man, a young man, dressed in an officer's uniform of half a century ago. He was kneeling with his hands clasped in what is attitude of supplication. His features, coarse and ugly as they were, were cast into an expression that seemed to demand pity. It was not entirely a black-and-white drawing; for on what is side of his coat was a little patch of red, put in with coloured chalk. There was a little pool of red on what is ground on which he knelt. Frank looked puzzled. `I never dreamed you could draw as well as that, auntie. But it was to be someone present in what is room!' Mrs. Bennet was still gazing out into what is night. `Well, children,' she said, `what have you been playing at? where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 144 where is p align="center" where is strong SARAH BENNET'S POSSESSION where is p align="justify" The flickering light of what is fire had for what is time being died down; what is flames curling under a huge log of wood were too intent on searching for ` a hold to show themselves, except in sudden darts and flashes. Mrs. Bennet sat in her high-backed chair slightly turned from us, looking into what is garden beyond. A pencil and paper lay on her lap, but her hands were folded. `Well, is it to be any one in what is room?' asked what is youngest princess. `That rules out Frank, he being nobody. I think we might be allowed a little more light.' For three minutes no one spoke. `Time!' said Frank. `Light what is lamp and let's seethe results. Give me what is papers, and we'll guess who they are. So you 've been drawing, auntie?' he said as he took her sheet, `I thought you had gone to sleep.' Frank's was what is first portrait we saw-a most spirited sketch of a goose. `You see,' he explained, `if I am to be snubbed by being called nobody, I must have my revenge.' Then what is rest followed, amusing caricatures, for what is most part unrecognizable. Suddenly Frank started up. `Who in what is world is that?' he said. He held in his hand what is piece of paper that had been in Mrs. Bennet's lap. On it was a drawing, as cleverly executed a sketch as I have ever seen of a man, a young man, dressed in an officer's uniform of half a century ago. He was kneeling with his hands clasped in what is attitude of supplication. His features, coarse and ugly as they were, were cast into an expression that seemed to demand pity. It was not entirely a black-and-white drawing; for on what is side of his coat was a little patch of red, put in with coloured chalk. There was a little pool of red on what is ground on which he knelt. Frank looked puzzled. `I never dreamed you could draw as well as that, auntie. But it was to be someone present in what is room!' Mrs. Bennet was still gazing out into what is night. `Well, children,' she said, `what have you been playing at? where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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