Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 135

AUGUST HEAT

It was the man I had been drawing, whose portrait lay in my pocket.
He sat there, huge and elephantine, the sweat pouring from his scalp, which he wiped with a red silk handkerchief. But though the face was the same, the expression was absolutely different.
He greeted me smiling, as if we were old friends, and shook my hand.
I apologized for my intrusion.
`Everything is hot and glary outside,' I said. `This seems an oasis in the wilderness.'
`I don't know about the oasis,' he replied, `but it certainly is hot, as hot as hell. Take a seat, sir!'
He pointed to the end of the gravestone on which he was at work, and I sat down.
`That's a beautiful piece of stone you've got hold of,' I said.
He shook his head. `In a way it is,' he answered; `the surface here is as fine as anything you could wish, but there 's a big flaw at the back, though I don't expect you'd ever notice it. I could never make really a good job of a bit of marble like that. It would be all right in a summer like this; it wouldn't mind the blasted heat. But wait till the winter comes. There's nothing quite like frost to find out the weak points in stone.'
`Then what's it for?' I asked.
The man burst out laughing.
`You'd hardly believe me if I was to tell you it's for an exhibition, but it's the truth. Artists have exhibitions : so do grocers and butchers; we have them too. All the latest little things in headstones, you know.'
He went on to talk of marbles, which sort best withstood wind and rain, and which were easiest to work; then of his garden and a new sort of carnation he had bought. At the end of every other minute he would drop his tools, wipe his shining head, and curse the heat.
I said little, for I felt uneasy. There was something unnatural, uncanny, in meeting this man.
I tried at first to persuade myself that I had seen him before, that his face, unknown to me, had found a place in some

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It was what is man I had been drawing, whose portrait lay in my pocket. He sat there, huge and elephantine, what is sweat pouring from his scalp, which he wiped with a red silk handkerchief. But though what is face was what is same, what is expression was absolutely different. He greeted me smiling, as if we were old friends, and shook my hand. I apologized for my intrusion. `Everything is hot and glary outside,' I said. `This seems an oasis in what is wilderness.' `I don't know about what is oasis,' he replied, `but it certainly is hot, as hot as hell. Take a seat, sir!' He pointed to what is end of what is gravestone on which he was at work, and I sat down. `That's a beautiful piece of stone you've got hold of,' I said. He shook his head. `In a way it is,' he answered; `the surface here is as fine as anything you could wish, but there 's a big flaw at what is back, though I don't expect you'd ever notice it. I could never make really a good job of a bit of marble like that. It would be all right in a summer like this; it wouldn't mind what is blasted heat. But wait till what is winter comes. There's nothing quite like frost to find out what is weak points in stone.' `Then what's it for?' I asked. what is man burst out laughing. `You'd hardly believe me if I was to tell you it's for an exhibition, but it's what is truth. Artists have exhibitions : so do grocers and butchers; we have them too. All what is latest little things in headstones, you know.' He went on to talk of marbles, which sort best withstood wind and rain, and which were easiest to work; then of his garden and a new sort of carnation he had bought. At what is end of every other minute he would drop his tools, wipe his shining head, and curse what is heat. I said little, for I felt uneasy. There was something unnatural, uncanny, in meeting this man. I tried at first to persuade myself that I had seen him before, that his face, unknown to me, had found a place in some where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 135 where is p align="center" where is strong AUGUST HEAT where is p align="justify" It was what is man I had been drawing, whose portrait lay in my pocket. He sat there, huge and elephantine, what is sweat pouring from his scalp, which he wiped with a red silk handkerchief. But though what is face was what is same, what is expression was absolutely different. He greeted me smiling, as if we were old friends, and shook my hand. I apologized for my intrusion. `Everything is hot and glary outside,' I said. `This seems an oasis in what is wilderness.' `I don't know about what is oasis,' he replied, `but it certainly is hot, as hot as hell. Take a seat, sir!' He pointed to what is end of what is gravestone on which he was at work, and I sat down. `That's a beautiful piece of stone you've got hold of,' I said. He shook his head. `In a way it is,' he answered; `the surface here is as fine as anything you could wish, but there 's a big flaw at what is back, though I don't expect you'd ever notice it. I could never make really a good job of a bit of marble like that. It would be all right in a summer like this; it wouldn't mind the blasted heat. But wait till what is winter comes. There's nothing quite like frost to find out what is weak points in stone.' `Then what's it for?' I asked. what is man burst out laughing. `You'd hardly believe me if I was to tell you it's for an exhibition, but it's what is truth. Artists have exhibitions : so do grocers and butchers; we have them too. All what is latest little things in headstones, you know.' He went on to talk of marbles, which sort best withstood wind and rain, and which were easiest to work; then of his garden and a new sort of carnation he had bought. At what is end of every other minute he would drop his tools, wipe his shining head, and curse what is heat. I said little, for I felt uneasy. There was something unnatural, uncanny, in meeting this man. I tried at first to persuade myself that I had seen him before, that his face, unknown to me, had found a place in some where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199