Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 131

THE FOLLOWER

`Do I understand,' said Canon Rathbone, `that Mr. Stanton is an author? I am afraid I did not know. I am afraid I may have been rather indiscreet, a little precipitate. You will, of course, Mr. Stanton, regard what I have said as strictly confidential. I mean, I mean-'
`We know exactly what you mean,' said Miss Newton with a laugh. `You don't want fact turned into delightful fiction.'
`I am sure Mr. Stanton knows what I mean. I like to think of myself, Miss Stanton, as a philosophical person who makes modern and familiar, things ... things that are rather difficult to understand. I fear, I distrust-you will forgive me I know, Mr. Stanton, quite probably I am quite mistaken-the imagination of the writer of fiction. Such a dangerous gift it always seems to me, so disturbingly dangerous. Dr. Curtius, we must be going. Such a very pleasant visit, Miss Stanton, my ... my asthma, you know, Mrs. Bramley, impossible almost for me to get to church. You must all come and visit us at the Old Vicarage. So very kind of you, such a very enjoyable afternoon. Don't trouble to see us to the door, Mr. Stanton. I assure you we can find our own way out.'
`Good-bye,' said Miss Stanton, `I am afraid we have done little to entertain Dr. Curtius.'
`I am happy,' he said as he bowed low over her hand, `to be Canon Rathbone's-what do you say? Disciple? No, follower.'
Stanton went with his visitors to the door. He put his hand for a moment into the hot, moist hand of Canon Rathbone, into the cold, dry hand of Dr. Curtius. Without a smile he said good-bye and watched them depart down the narrow gravel path, the old man leading with that curious shuffling gait that yet was almost half a run, the other, black-bearded, blackcoated, following in his shadow with long inexorable strides.
He didn't feel like facing the chatter of the drawing-room. Something queer had happened, and he didn't know what it was. Of course he couldn't write that story now. Even if Hilda Newton hadn't been there he couldn't have written it. But it didn't matter. It would only have been a trifle anyway.

Page 132

THE FOLLOWER

But why had they spiked his guns? How did they know that he had guns to spike? Why had he been so unmistakably. warned off? Unless ... unless he had got too near the truth? What was the truth?
With a feeling almost of relief he opened the drawing-room door. The chatter at least was reassuring. He feared to submit himself to an unknown fear.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Do I understand,' said Canon Rathbone, `that Mr. Stanton is an author? I am afraid I did not know. I am afraid I may have been rather indiscreet, a little precipitate. You will, of course, Mr. Stanton, regard what I have said as strictly confidential. I mean, I mean-' `We know exactly what you mean,' said Miss Newton with a laugh. `You don't want fact turned into delightful fiction.' `I am sure Mr. Stanton knows what I mean. I like to think of myself, Miss Stanton, as a philosophical person who makes modern and familiar, things ... things that are rather difficult to understand. I fear, I distrust-you will forgive me I know, Mr. Stanton, quite probably I am quite mistaken-the imagination of what is writer of fiction. Such a dangerous gift it always seems to me, so disturbingly dangerous. Dr. Curtius, we must be going. Such a very pleasant what is , Miss Stanton, my ... my asthma, you know, Mrs. Bramley, impossible almost for me to get to church. You must all come and what is us at what is Old Vicarage. So very kind of you, such a very enjoyable afternoon. Don't trouble to see us to what is door, Mr. Stanton. I assure you we can find our own way out.' `Good-bye,' said Miss Stanton, `I am afraid we have done little to entertain Dr. Curtius.' `I am happy,' he said as he bowed low over her hand, `to be Canon Rathbone's-what do you say? Disciple? No, follower.' Stanton went with his what is ors to what is door. He put his hand for a moment into what is hot, moist hand of Canon Rathbone, into what is cold, dry hand of Dr. Curtius. Without a smile he said good-bye and watched them depart down what is narrow gravel path, what is old man leading with that curious shuffling gait that yet was almost half a run, what is other, black-bearded, blackcoated, following in his shadow with long inexorable strides. He didn't feel like facing what is chatter of what is drawing-room. Something queer had happened, and he didn't know what it was. Of course he couldn't write that story now. Even if Hilda Newton hadn't been there he couldn't have written it. But it didn't matter. It would only have been a trifle anyway. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 131 where is p align="center" where is strong THE FOLLOWER where is p align="justify" `Do I understand,' said Canon Rathbone, `that Mr. Stanton is an author? I am afraid I did not know. I am afraid I may have been rather indiscreet, a little precipitate. You will, of course, Mr. Stanton, regard what I have said as strictly confidential. I mean, I mean-' `We know exactly what you mean,' said Miss Newton with a laugh. `You don't want fact turned into delightful fiction.' `I am sure Mr. Stanton knows what I mean. I like to think of myself, Miss Stanton, as a philosophical person who makes modern and familiar, things ... things that are rather difficult to understand. I fear, I distrust-you will forgive me I know, Mr. Stanton, quite probably I am quite mistaken-the imagination of what is writer of fiction. Such a dangerous gift it always seems to me, so disturbingly dangerous. Dr. Curtius, we must be going. Such a very pleasant what is , Miss Stanton, my ... my asthma, you know, Mrs. Bramley, impossible almost for me to get to church. You must all come and what is us at the Old Vicarage. So very kind of you, such a very enjoyable afternoon. Don't trouble to see us to what is door, Mr. Stanton. I assure you we can find our own way out.' `Good-bye,' said Miss Stanton, `I am afraid we have done little to entertain Dr. Curtius.' `I am happy,' he said as he bowed low over her hand, `to be Canon Rathbone's-what do you say? Disciple? No, follower.' Stanton went with his what is ors to what is door. He put his hand for a moment into what is hot, moist hand of Canon Rathbone, into what is cold, dry hand of Dr. Curtius. Without a smile he said good-bye and watched them depart down what is narrow gravel path, what is old man leading with that curious shuffling gait that yet was almost half a run, the other, black-bearded, blackcoated, following in his shadow with long inexorable strides. He didn't feel like facing what is chatter of what is drawing-room. Something queer had happened, and he didn't know what it was. Of course he couldn't write that story now. Even if Hilda Newton hadn't been there he couldn't have written it. But it didn't matter. It would only have been a trifle anyway. where is p align="left" Page 132 where is p align="center" where is strong THE FOLLOWER where is p align="justify" But why had they spiked his guns? How did they know that he had guns to spike? Why had he been so unmistakably. warned off? Unless ... unless he had got too near what is truth? What was what is truth? With a feeling almost of relief he opened what is drawing-room door. what is chatter at least was reassuring. He feared to submit himself to an unknown fear. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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