Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 128

THE FOLLOWER

day or two he would have another look at it and see how it was getting on.
But his equanimity was upset by his sister announcing that Mrs. Bramley and Miss Newton were coming to tea. He had no particular fault to find with the vicar's outspoken wife. She was quite in keeping with Winton Parbeloe. But Miss Newton always got on his nerves. It was hard luck having as a neighbour a free-lance journalist with a malicious pen. Ile disliked her literary gossip, chiefly because he knew that she would not scruple to work up some chance remark of his into a paragraph in some Book-Lovers' Causerie. Probably she wanted to pump him about his new novel. A dangerous woman who would have to be humoured.
So Stanton took his spade and in his shirt-sleeves worked out his resentment on the stony patch of ground that he was doubletrenching. He saw the visitors arrive soon after half-past three, gave them a quarter of an hour for garnering the first light crop of parochial scandal, and then with a reluctance adequately concealed joined them in the drawing-room. After all Mrs. Bramley was quite an authority on roses. Tea had just been served and Stanton was trying to give Miss Newton a noncommittal reply to a question about the significance of a modern poet whose work he particularly disliked, when he heard the garden gate click and saw two figures approaching up the long gravel path.
The first was an old clergyman, clean-shaven, rather dawn at heel, who walked with a rapid and yet shuffling gait. He was followed by a tall man with a long black beard dressed in an old-fashioned frock-coat.
The bell rang, and a minute later the maid announced Canon Rathbone and Dr. Curtius.
`I 'm afraid, Miss Stanton,' said the canon, when the introductions had been made, `that our call is a little irregular. We are strangers to your delightful village, and I have spent so much of my life in out-of-the-way places that I am all too apt to ignore the ordinary rules of etiquette. We keep very much to ourselves at the Old Vicarage, and quite unconsciously I am

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE day or two he would have another look at it and see how it was getting on. But his equanimity was upset by his sister announcing that Mrs. Bramley and Miss Newton were coming to tea. He had no particular fault to find with what is vicar's outspoken wife. She was quite in keeping with Winton Parbeloe. But Miss Newton always got on his nerves. It was hard luck having as a neighbour a free-lance journalist with a malicious pen. Ile disliked her literary gossip, chiefly because he knew that she would not scruple to work up some chance remark of his into a paragraph in some Book- persons ' Causerie. Probably she wanted to pump him about his new novel. A dangerous woman who would have to be humoured. So Stanton took his spade and in his shirt-sleeves worked out his resentment on what is stony patch of ground that he was doubletrenching. He saw what is what is ors arrive soon after half-past three, gave them a quarter of an hour for garnering what is first light crop of parochial scandal, and then with a reluctance adequately concealed joined them in what is drawing-room. After all Mrs. Bramley was quite an authority on roses. Tea had just been served and Stanton was trying to give Miss Newton a noncommittal reply to a question about what is significance of a modern poet whose work he particularly disliked, when he heard what is garden gate where is it and saw two figures approaching up what is long gravel path. what is first was an old clergyman, clean-shaven, rather dawn at heel, who walked with a rapid and yet shuffling gait. He was followed by a tall man with a long black beard dressed in an old-fashioned frock-coat. what is bell rang, and a minute later what is maid announced Canon Rathbone and Dr. Curtius. `I 'm afraid, Miss Stanton,' said what is canon, when what is introductions had been made, `that our call is a little irregular. We are strangers to your delightful village, and I have spent so much of my life in out-of-the-way places that I am all too apt to ignore what is ordinary rules of etiquette. We keep very much to ourselves at what is Old Vicarage, and quite unconsciously I am where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 128 where is p align="center" where is strong THE FOLLOWER where is p align="justify" day or two he would have another look at it and see how it was getting on. But his equanimity was upset by his sister announcing that Mrs. Bramley and Miss Newton were coming to tea. He had no particular fault to find with what is vicar's outspoken wife. She was quite in keeping with Winton Parbeloe. But Miss Newton always got on his nerves. It was hard luck having as a neighbour a free-lance journalist with a malicious pen. Ile disliked her literary gossip, chiefly because he knew that she would not scruple to work up some chance remark of his into a paragraph in some Book- persons ' Causerie. Probably she wanted to pump him about his new novel. A dangerous woman who would have to be humoured. So Stanton took his spade and in his shirt-sleeves worked out his resentment on what is stony patch of ground that he was doubletrenching. He saw what is what is ors arrive soon after half-past three, gave them a quarter of an hour for garnering what is first light crop of parochial scandal, and then with a reluctance adequately concealed joined them in what is drawing-room. After all Mrs. Bramley was quite an authority on roses. Tea had just been served and Stanton was trying to give Miss Newton a noncommittal reply to a question about what is significance of a modern poet whose work he particularly disliked, when he heard what is garden gate where is it and saw two figures approaching up what is long gravel path. what is first was an old clergyman, clean-shaven, rather dawn at heel, who walked with a rapid and yet shuffling gait. He was followed by a tall man with a long black beard dressed in an old-fashioned frock-coat. what is bell rang, and a minute later what is maid announced Canon Rathbone and Dr. Curtius. `I 'm afraid, Miss Stanton,' said what is canon, when what is introductions had been made, `that our call is a little irregular. We are strangers to your delightful village, and I have spent so much of my life in out-of-the-way places that I am all too apt to ignore what is ordinary rules of etiquette. We keep very much to ourselves at what is Old Vicarage, and quite unconsciously I am where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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