Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 123

ACROSS THE MOORS

A farmer saw me on my way, turning back when I reached the moor road.
`The sunset the previous evening had been one of the most lovely I ever remember to have seen. The whole vault of heaven had been scattered with flakes of white cloud, tipped with rosy pink like the strewn petals of a full-blown rose.
`But that night all was changed. The sky was an absolutely dull slate colour, except in one corner of the west where a thin rift showed the last saffron tint of the sullen sunset. As I walked, stiff and footsore, my spirits sank. It must have been the marked contrast between the two evenings, the one so lovely, so full of promise (the corn was still out in the fields spoiling for fine weather), the other so gloomy, so sad with all the dead weight of autumn and winter days to come. And then added to this sense of heavy depression came another different feeling which I surprised myself by recognizing as fear.
`I did not know why I was afraid.
`The moors lay on either side of me, unbroken except for a straggling line of turf shooting-butts, that stood within a stone's throw of the road.
`The only sound I had heard for the last half hour was the cry of the startled grouse-Go back, go back, go back. But yet the feeling of fear was there, affecting a low centre of my brain through some little-used physical channel.
`I buttoned my coat closer, and tried to divert my thoughts by thinking of next Sunday's sermon.
`I had chosen to preach on job. There is much in the oldfashioned notion of the book, apart from all the subtleties of the higher criticism, that appeals to country people; the loss of herds and crops, the break up of the family. I would not have dared to speak, had not I too been a farmer; my own glebe land had been flooded three weeks before, and I suppose I stood to lose as much as any man in the parish. As I walked along the road repeating to myself the first chapter of the book, I stopped at the twelfth verse :
" `And the Lord said unto Satan: Behold, all that he hath is in thy power . . ."

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE A farmer saw me on my way, turning back when I reached what is moor road. `The sunset what is previous evening had been one of what is most lovely I ever remember to have seen. what is whole vault of heaven had been scattered with flakes of white cloud, tipped with rosy pink like what is strewn petals of a full-blown rose. `But that night all was changed. what is sky was an absolutely dull slate colour, except in one corner of what is west where a thin rift showed what is last saffron tint of what is sullen sunset. As I walked, stiff and footsore, my spirits sank. It must have been what is marked contrast between what is two evenings, what is one so lovely, so full of promise (the corn was still out in what is fields spoiling for fine weather), what is other so gloomy, so sad with all what is dead weight of autumn and winter days to come. And then added to this sense of heavy depression came another different feeling which I surprised myself by recognizing as fear. `I did not know why I was afraid. `The moors lay on either side of me, unbroken except for a straggling line of turf shooting-butts, that stood within a stone's throw of what is road. `The only sound I had heard for what is last half hour was what is cry of what is startled grouse-Go back, go back, go back. But yet what is feeling of fear was there, affecting a low centre of my brain through some little-used physical channel. `I buttoned my coat closer, and tried to divert my thoughts by thinking of next Sunday's sermon. `I had chosen to preach on job. There is much in what is oldfashioned notion of what is book, apart from all what is subtleties of what is higher criticism, that appeals to country people; what is loss of herds and crops, what is break up of what is family. I would not have dared to speak, had not I too been a farmer; my own glebe land had been flooded three weeks before, and I suppose I stood to lose as much as any man in what is parish. As I walked along what is road repeating to myself what is first chapter of what is book, I stopped at what is twelfth verse : "`And what is Lord said unto fun : Behold, all that he hath is in thy power . . ." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 123 where is p align="center" where is strong ACROSS what is MOORS where is p align="justify" A farmer saw me on my way, turning back when I reached what is moor road. `The sunset what is previous evening had been one of what is most lovely I ever remember to have seen. what is whole vault of heaven had been scattered with flakes of white cloud, tipped with rosy pink like what is strewn petals of a full-blown rose. `But that night all was changed. what is sky was an absolutely dull slate colour, except in one corner of what is west where a thin rift showed what is last saffron tint of what is sullen sunset. As I walked, stiff and footsore, my spirits sank. It must have been what is marked contrast between what is two evenings, what is one so lovely, so full of promise (the corn was still out in what is fields spoiling for fine weather), what is other so gloomy, so sad with all what is dead weight of autumn and winter days to come. And then added to this sense of heavy depression came another different feeling which I surprised myself by recognizing as fear. `I did not know why I was afraid. `The moors lay on either side of me, unbroken except for a straggling line of turf shooting-butts, that stood within a stone's throw of what is road. `The only sound I had heard for what is last half hour was what is cry of what is startled grouse-Go back, go back, go back. But yet what is feeling of fear was there, affecting a low centre of my brain through some little-used physical channel. `I buttoned my coat closer, and tried to divert my thoughts by thinking of next Sunday's sermon. `I had chosen to preach on job. There is much in what is oldfashioned notion of what is book, apart from all what is subtleties of what is higher criticism, that appeals to country people; what is loss of herds and crops, what is break up of what is family. I would not have dared to speak, had not I too been a farmer; my own glebe land had been flooded three weeks before, and I suppose I stood to lose as much as any man in what is parish. As I walked along what is road repeating to myself what is first chapter of what is book, I stopped at what is twelfth verse : " `And what is Lord said unto fun : Behold, all that he hath is in thy power . . ." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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