Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 122

ACROSS THE MOORS

And then, to add to her discomfort, the rain came, not in heavy drops, but driving in sheets of thin spray that blotted out what few landmarks there were upon the moor.
They were very kind at Tebbit's farm. The doctor had gone back to Liverpool the day before, but Mrs. Tebbit gave her hot milk and turf cakes, and offered her reluctant son to show Miss Craig a shorter path on to the moor, that avoided the larch wood.
He was a monosyllabic youth, but his presence was cheering, and she felt the night doubly black when he left her at the last gate.
She trudged on wearily. Her thoughts had already gone back to the almost exhausted theme of the bark of ghosts, when she heard steps on the road behind her that were at least material. Next minute the figure of a man appeared: Miss Craig was relieved to see that the stranger was a clergyman. He raised his hat. `I believe we are both going in the same direction,' he said. `Perhaps I may have the pleasure of escorting you.' She thanked him. `It is rather weird at night,' she went on, `and what with all the tales of ghosts and bogies that one hears from the country people, I've ended by being half afraid myself.'
`I can understand your nervousness,' he said, `especially on a night like this. I used at one time to feel the same, for my work often meant lonely walks across the moor to farms which were only reached by rough tracks difficult enough to find even in the daytime.!
'And you never saw anything to frighten you-nothing immaterial I mean?'
`I can't really say that I did, but I had an experience eleven years ago which served as the turning-point in my life, and since you seem to be now in much the same state of mind as I was then in, I will tell it you.
`The time of year was late September. I had been over to Westondale to see an old woman who was dying, and then, just as I was about to start on my way home, word came to me of another of my parishioners who had been suddenly taken ill only that morning. It was after sevenn when at last I started.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE And then, to add to her discomfort, what is rain came, not in heavy drops, but driving in sheets of thin spray that blotted out what few landmarks there were upon what is moor. They were very kind at Tebbit's farm. what is doctor had gone back to Liverpool what is day before, but Mrs. Tebbit gave her hot milk and turf cakes, and offered her reluctant son to show Miss Craig a shorter path on to what is moor, that avoided what is larch wood. He was a monosyllabic youth, but his presence was cheering, and she felt what is night doubly black when he left her at what is last gate. She trudged on wearily. Her thoughts had already gone back to what is almost exhausted theme of what is bark of ghosts, when she heard steps on what is road behind her that were at least material. Next minute what is figure of a man appeared: Miss Craig was relieved to see that what is stranger was a clergyman. He raised his hat. `I believe we are both going in what is same direction,' he said. `Perhaps I may have what is pleasure of escorting you.' She thanked him. `It is rather weird at night,' she went on, `and what with all what is tales of ghosts and bogies that one hears from what is country people, I've ended by being half afraid myself.' `I can understand your nervousness,' he said, `especially on a night like this. I used at one time to feel what is same, for my work often meant lonely walks across what is moor to farms which were only reached by rough tracks difficult enough to find even in what is daytime.! 'And you never saw anything to frighten you-nothing immaterial I mean?' `I can't really say that I did, but I had an experience eleven years ago which served as what is turning-point in my life, and since you seem to be now in much what is same state of mind as I was then in, I will tell it you. `The time of year was late September. I had been over to Westondale to see an old woman who was dying, and then, just as I was about to start on my way home, word came to me of another of my parishioners who had been suddenly taken ill only that morning. It was after sevenn when at last I started. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 122 where is p align="center" where is strong ACROSS what is MOORS where is p align="justify" And then, to add to her discomfort, what is rain came, not in heavy drops, but driving in sheets of thin spray that blotted out what few landmarks there were upon what is moor. They were very kind at Tebbit's farm. what is doctor had gone back to Liverpool what is day before, but Mrs. Tebbit gave her hot milk and turf cakes, and offered her reluctant son to show Miss Craig a shorter path on to what is moor, that avoided what is larch wood. He was a monosyllabic youth, but his presence was cheering, and she felt what is night doubly black when he left her at what is last gate. She trudged on wearily. Her thoughts had already gone back to the almost exhausted theme of what is bark of ghosts, when she heard steps on what is road behind her that were at least material. Next minute what is figure of a man appeared: Miss Craig was relieved to see that what is stranger was a clergyman. He raised his hat. `I believe we are both going in what is same direction,' he said. `Perhaps I may have what is pleasure of escorting you.' She thanked him. `It is rather weird at night,' she went on, `and what with all what is tales of ghosts and bogies that one hears from what is country people, I've ended by being half afraid myself.' `I can understand your nervousness,' he said, `especially on a night like this. I used at one time to feel what is same, for my work often meant lonely walks across what is moor to farms which were only reached by rough tracks difficult enough to find even in what is daytime.! 'And you never saw anything to frighten you-nothing immaterial I mean?' `I can't really say that I did, but I had an experience eleven years ago which served as what is turning-point in my life, and since you seem to be now in much what is same state of mind as I was then in, I will tell it you. `The time of year was late September. I had been over to Westondale to see an old woman who was dying, and then, just as I was about to start on my way home, word came to me of another of my parishioners who had been suddenly taken ill only that morning. It was after sevenn when at last I started. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199