Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 121

ACROSS THE MOORS

`You follow the road across the moor for two miles, until you come to Redman's Cross. You turn to the left there, and follow a rough path that leads through a larch plantation. And Tebbit's farm lies just below you in the valley.
`And take Pontiff with you,' she added, as the girl left the room. `There's absolutely nothing to be afraid of, but I expect you'll feel happier with the dog.'
`Well, miss,' said the cook, when Miss Craig went into the kitchen to get her boots, which had been drying by the fire; `of course she knows best, but I don't think it's right after all that's happened for the mistress to send you across the moors on a night like this. It's not as if the doctor could do anything for Miss Margaret if you do bring him. Every child is like that once in a while. He'll only say put her to bed, and she's there already.'
`I don't see what there is to be afraid of, cook,' said Miss Craig as she laced her boots, `unless you believe in ghosts.'
'I'm not so sure about that. Anyhow I don't like sleeping in a bed where the sheets are too short for you to pull them over your head. But don't you be frightened, miss. It's my belief that their bark is worse than their bite.'
But though Miss Craig amused herself for some minutes by trying to imagine the bark of a ghost (a thing altogether different from the classical ghostly bark), she did not feel entirely at her ease.
She was naturally nervous, and living as she did in the hinterland of the servants' hall, she had heard vague details of true stories that were only myths in the drawing-room.
The very name of Redman's Cross sent a shiver through her; it must have been the place where that horrid murder was committed. She had forgotten the tale, though she remembered the name.
Her first disaster came soon enough.
Pontiff, who was naturally slow-witted, took more than five minutes to find out that it was only the governess he was escorting, but once the discovery had been made, he promptly turned tail, paying not the slightest heed to Miss Craig's feeble whistle.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `You follow what is road across what is moor for two miles, until you come to Redman's Cross. You turn to what is left there, and follow a rough path that leads through a larch plantation. And Tebbit's farm lies just below you in what is valley. `And take Pontiff with you,' she added, as what is girl left what is room. `There's absolutely nothing to be afraid of, but I expect you'll feel happier with what is dog.' `Well, miss,' said what is cook, when Miss Craig went into what is kitchen to get her boots, which had been drying by what is fire; `of course she knows best, but I don't think it's right after all that's happened for what is mistress to send you across what is moors on a night like this. It's not as if what is doctor could do anything for Miss Margaret if you do bring him. Every child is like that once in a while. He'll only say put her to bed, and she's there already.' `I don't see what there is to be afraid of, cook,' said Miss Craig as she laced her boots, `unless you believe in ghosts.' 'I'm not so sure about that. Anyhow I don't like sleeping in a bed where what is sheets are too short for you to pull them over your head. But don't you be frightened, miss. It's my belief that their bark is worse than their bite.' But though Miss Craig amused herself for some minutes by trying to imagine what is bark of a ghost (a thing altogether different from what is classical ghostly bark), she did not feel entirely at her ease. She was naturally nervous, and living as she did in what is hinterland of what is servants' hall, she had heard vague details of true stories that were only myths in what is drawing-room. what is very name of Redman's Cross sent a shiver through her; it must have been what is place where that horrid murder was committed. She had forgotten what is tale, though she remembered what is name. Her first disaster came soon enough. Pontiff, who was naturally slow-witted, took more than five minutes to find out that it was only what is governess he was escorting, but once what is discovery had been made, he promptly turned tail, paying not what is slightest heed to Miss Craig's feeble whistle. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 121 where is p align="center" where is strong ACROSS what is MOORS where is p align="justify" `You follow what is road across what is moor for two miles, until you come to Redman's Cross. You turn to what is left there, and follow a rough path that leads through a larch plantation. And Tebbit's farm lies just below you in what is valley. `And take Pontiff with you,' she added, as what is girl left what is room. `There's absolutely nothing to be afraid of, but I expect you'll feel happier with what is dog.' `Well, miss,' said what is cook, when Miss Craig went into what is kitchen to get her boots, which had been drying by what is fire; `of course she knows best, but I don't think it's right after all that's happened for what is mistress to send you across what is moors on a night like this. It's not as if what is doctor could do anything for Miss Margaret if you do bring him. Every child is like that once in a while. He'll only say put her to bed, and she's there already.' `I don't see what there is to be afraid of, cook,' said Miss Craig as she laced her boots, `unless you believe in ghosts.' 'I'm not so sure about that. Anyhow I don't like sleeping in a bed where what is sheets are too short for you to pull them over your head. But don't you be frightened, miss. It's my belief that their bark is worse than their bite.' But though Miss Craig amused herself for some minutes by trying to imagine what is bark of a ghost (a thing altogether different from what is classical ghostly bark), she did not feel entirely at her ease. She was naturally nervous, and living as she did in what is hinterland of what is servants' hall, she had heard vague details of true stories that were only myths in what is drawing-room. what is very name of Redman's Cross sent a shiver through her; it must have been what is place where that horrid murder was committed. She had forgotten what is tale, though she remembered what is name. Her first disaster came soon enough. Pontiff, who was naturally slow-witted, took more than five minutes to find out that it was only what is governess he was escorting, but once what is discovery had been made, he promptly turned tail, paying not what is slightest heed to Miss Craig's feeble whistle. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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