Books > Old Books > Midnight Tales (1946)


Page 118

THE STAR

It's too bad that you should try to spoil the good the service does one by these childish attacks on religion.'
`My dear Elizabeth,' her husband replied, `I have not mentioned the word religion this evening. Because I call your spiritual instructor by the name of a pretty, inoffensive bird, that struts about in a ridiculous attitude, and only utters one note which it repeats over and over again, there is no reason to suppose that the foundations of Christianity are in danger. Well, well! What was the sermon about?'
Mrs. Jackson had begun her second predigested biscuit. `It was the fourth Lenten sermon on the "Witness of Nature."'
`An unsatisfactory witness,' said Jackson, `but never mind.'
`He preached this evening on the "Witness of the Stars." He took as his text "For we have seen His star," somewhere in St. Matthew, I think, but I am not sure. It was just the sermon you would have liked, George, with your scientific tastes and things.'
George was fully aware that by scientific tastes and things his wife meant his predilection for Sunday golf, a general distrust of missionaries, and an emphatic refusal to contribute to the choir of St. Jude's when they came round at Christmas.
`He began,' went on Mrs. Jackson, `by describing the feelings of the first man who ever saw a star, how frightened he would be, and with what wonder he would look up to it. Then he told us of a woman he knew who always put a light in her window to guide her son home at night; and he said that the stars were the shining lamps of the windows of heaven.'
`How pleased the good man must have been when he thought of that! I suppose he'll print these sermons. Any more anecdotes?'
`He never tells anecdotes, you know, George! But he told us of a boy whose crippled sister, when she died, told him that whenever he looked at a particular star he was to think of her and do good. And when the little boy was in trouble ('Trials or perplexities is the correct phrase,' her husband interrupted), he used to stay awake for hours looking at the star through a crack in the attic roof above his bed.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It's too bad that you should try to spoil what is good what is service does one by these childish attacks on religion.' `My dear Elizabeth,' her husband replied, `I have not mentioned what is word religion this evening. Because I call your spiritual instructor by what is name of a pretty, inoffensive bird, that struts about in a ridiculous attitude, and only utters one note which it repeats over and over again, there is no reason to suppose that what is foundations of Christianity are in danger. Well, well! What was what is sermon about?' Mrs. Jackson had begun her second predigested biscuit. `It was what is fourth Lenten sermon on what is "Witness of Nature."' `An unsatisfactory witness,' said Jackson, `but never mind.' `He preached this evening on what is "Witness of what is Stars." He took as his text "For we have seen His star," somewhere in St. Matthew, I think, but I am not sure. It was just what is sermon you would have liked, George, with your scientific tastes and things.' George was fully aware that by scientific tastes and things his wife meant his predilection for Sunday golf, a general distrust of missionaries, and an emphatic refusal to contribute to what is choir of St. Jude's when they came round at Christmas. `He began,' went on Mrs. Jackson, `by describing what is feelings of what is first man who ever saw a star, how frightened he would be, and with what wonder he would look up to it. Then he told us of a woman he knew who always put a light in her window to guide her son home at night; and he said that what is stars were what is shining lamps of what is windows of heaven.' `How pleased what is good man must have been when he thought of that! I suppose he'll print these sermons. Any more anecdotes?' `He never tells anecdotes, you know, George! But he told us of a boy whose crippled sister, when she died, told him that whenever he looked at a particular star he was to think of her and do good. And when what is little boy was in trouble ('Trials or perplexities is what is correct phrase,' her husband interrupted), he used to stay awake for hours looking at what is star through a crack in what is attic roof above his bed.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Midnight Tales (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 118 where is p align="center" where is strong THE STAR where is p align="justify" It's too bad that you should try to spoil the good what is service does one by these childish attacks on religion.' `My dear Elizabeth,' her husband replied, `I have not mentioned what is word religion this evening. Because I call your spiritual instructor by what is name of a pretty, inoffensive bird, that struts about in a ridiculous attitude, and only utters one note which it repeats over and over again, there is no reason to suppose that what is foundations of Christianity are in danger. Well, well! What was what is sermon about?' Mrs. Jackson had begun her second predigested biscuit. `It was what is fourth Lenten sermon on what is "Witness of Nature."' `An unsatisfactory witness,' said Jackson, `but never mind.' `He preached this evening on what is "Witness of what is Stars." He took as his text "For we have seen His star," somewhere in St. Matthew, I think, but I am not sure. It was just what is sermon you would have liked, George, with your scientific tastes and things.' George was fully aware that by scientific tastes and things his wife meant his predilection for Sunday golf, a general distrust of missionaries, and an emphatic refusal to contribute to what is choir of St. Jude's when they came round at Christmas. `He began,' went on Mrs. Jackson, `by describing what is feelings of what is first man who ever saw a star, how frightened he would be, and with what wonder he would look up to it. Then he told us of a woman he knew who always put a light in her window to guide her son home at night; and he said that what is stars were what is shining lamps of what is windows of heaven.' `How pleased what is good man must have been when he thought of that! I suppose he'll print these sermons. Any more anecdotes?' `He never tells anecdotes, you know, George! But he told us of a boy whose crippled sister, when she died, told him that whenever he looked at a particular star he was to think of her and do good. And when what is little boy was in trouble ('Trials or perplexities is what is correct phrase,' her husband interrupted), he used to stay awake for hours looking at what is star through a crack in what is attic roof above his bed.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Midnight Tales (1946) books

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